Criticize 'Friday,' not Rebecca Black


The latest ironic craze to sweep the nation is, undoubtedly, Rebecca Black's "Friday." The song has shown up everywhere — all across the Internet, on television and probably at every party you went to this weekend. Black's song is pretty much the epitome of bad pop music, using all of the worst tropes of America's somewhat vapid Top 40 tunes. It would be a brilliant parody of the state of popular music today, if it weren't for the fact that it is a serious song. But here's the thing — even though Black has rocketed to fame as the butt of everyone's jokes, the fact remains that she's been thrust into the national spotlight. She is a household name. Whether you're buying her song off iTunes ironically, she is still making money off it — and lots of money at that.

But you may feel bad about all the vitriol you've thrown her way when you find out what she is doing with that money. According to interview with Us magazine, Black is donating the proceeds of "Friday" to both relief efforts in Japan and her school, El Rancho Charter. This is a perfect example of separating the art from the artist — that is, if you are willing to consider "Friday" art in the first place, which many people probably aren't. Terminology aside, we cannot, or at least should not, be attacking Black personally. Sure, her song is unequivocally awful, but we have to keep in mind that she is a 13-year-old girl. If anything, it would be wrong to expect better from her than what she has given us.

Black appeared on "Good Morning America" to talk about some of the cyber-bullying she has endured in the wake of "Friday" going viral. It's sad that people — many of them grown adults — have been saying some pretty mean things about Black, especially considering how good a person she is proving herself to be. She's not a rich, fame-obsessed brat. She's just a girl with a dream.

While we definitely do not want to see Black stick around for much longer — the joke's old, and anyway you slice it, she still isn't a very talented singer — we give her credit for being a pretty mature 13-year-old. Not many people in her shoes would be donating their money to charity. The lesson that people can hopefully take from all of this is that, no matter how bad her song is, it is almost always inappropriate to launch ad hominem attacks on a 13-year-old girl. So let's all take a step back, calm down and quit giving Black such a hard time. Hate on her song if you must — just don't hate on her.


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