Barchi not doing job well enough


Letters to the editor


University President Robert L. Barchi has focused entirely too much on the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey merger and has failed to recognize that he’s weakening the University in many other ways.

According to a New York Times article earlier this month, it has been reported that Barchi wants to turn the Newark campus into a satellite campus of the University, so their SAT scores are not calculated into the average. While this will raise the University’s standing with the Association of American Universities, it will take away something very unique to the University: diversity. Barchi has said that Newark is the “diversity” campus and by turning it into a satellite campus and stripping it of many of its great programs, such as neuroscience and the business school, he is allowing the University to lose the diversity that makes it so great.

Although making New Brunswick a larger school may seem like a great idea, there is already so much going on with the merger that the University will simply be too hectic and disorganized. Eliminating a graduate school in Newark will give students fewer options. All Barchi seems to care about is creating a larger science campus in New Brunswick and bringing in Newark’s neuroscience program and the merger with UMDNJ. He is simply leaving the liberal arts behind.

Further, Barchi’s reaction to the recent University basketball situation is simply inexcusable. Could he have been so caught up with the merger that he overlooked a serious issue? His insensitivity does not stop there. At a meeting with the Latino faculty advisory group in New Brunswick, he claimed to have the same or worse difficulties early on in his career as minority groups, because he was a white man facing affirmative action. Sounds reasonable.

So please Barchi, become at least a little more sympathetic to those around you, and try not to get too wrapped up in going down in history as the man who successfully merged UMDNJ and the University. In fact, if you don’t remember the rest of your university, there may not be anyone to write that history.

Lindsay Sweeney is a School of Arts and Sciences junior majoring in journalism and media studies and history.


By Lindsay Sweeney

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