April 21, 2018 | ° F

EDITORIAL: White nationalists will not succeed at U.


Racist groups do not reflect true American values


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Last Wednesday, another round of white nationalistic flyers was found on George Street. The flyers were directed at white Americans and urged them to fulfill their "civic duty" by reporting all "illegal aliens" to Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. While the suggestion to report people for being in this country illegally is in itself not necessarily racist, the last statement on the flyers read, “AMERICA IS A WHITE NATION,” and on the bottom left corner "bloodandsoil.org" was printed, which is a website for an organization called Patriot Front that advocates for today’s white nationalist movement. For context, white supremacists that rallied at the University of Virginia in August chanted the phrase, “blood and soil,” among other things, such as “Jews will not replace us.” Thus there is a clear connection between the group that posted these flyers here at Rutgers and those who took part in the alt-Right rally in Charlottesville. With that said, it is clear that these flyers were not only posted with the aim of urging Americans to do their civic duty but to promote the same unsettling voice of racism here at Rutgers that we saw on the campus of the University of Virginia. 

Patriot Front, as well as other radical groups who have posted flyers like this on campus — such as Identity Evropa and Vanguard America — aims to remodel the American identity to exclude non-white people and anyone whose views do not align with theirs. For example, Patriot Front’s manifesto says, “An African may have lived, worked and even been classed as a citizen in America for centuries, yet he is not American. He is, as he likely prefers to be labelled, an African in America. The same rule applies to others who are not of the founding stock of our people, or do not share the common unconscious that permeates throughout our greater civilization, and the European diaspora.” 

The aforementioned ideas are dangerous. The majority of our nation, through law and social deliberation, has established the fact that we treat people with respect and accept their views regardless of the color of their skin, their hereditary lineage or whether we agree with them. The U.S. is essentially an amazing experiment, allowing freedom of culture and ideology. While these groups claim to be the true Americans, they blatantly and openly reject our country and its current foundational and democratic values. They wish to combat social acceptance and complain about their ideologies being shunned, while at the same time they seek to impede upon the lives of others in the name of their own vision of how the country should look. 

The U.S. has well-formulated free speech laws that allow for productive conversation on topics that may offend certain groups. Even the racist ideologies of groups such as Patriot Front are vested with the right to share their views. But the answer to speech that we disagree with is more speech. The Rutgers community has seen multiple instances of discriminatory flyers being posted on University buildings, but it has failed to respond effectively. The Rutgers community should come out as one against these vicious and hateful ideologies, so as to reiterate to the groups that hold them that they are outnumbered. If it truly does disagree, the community must actively demonstrate that it rejects these groups’ xenophobic and racist views.

Here in the United States, and especially at Rutgers, we accept one another for our opinions and beliefs, and we embrace love and acceptance over fear and banishment. We’ve learned from the history of the past century what such cynical ideologies can lead to. We must come together as a community and vehemently reject hate. We must work to replace hate with logical discourse and productive conversation. 

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The Daily Targum's editorials represent the views of the majority of the 149th editorial board. Columns, cartoons and letters do not necessarily reflect the views of the Targum Publishing Company or its staff.


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