December 19, 2018 | ° F

AAAS elects five Rutgers professors as fellows, honors contributions to science


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Scott Thomas, distinguished professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, was elected as a fellow by the AAAS for his contributions to particle physics, specifically supersymmetry and searching for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider.


Five Rutgers professors have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of Science Magazine, according to Rutgers Today

On Monday, Nov. 26, members of the AAAS announced 416 new fellows, emphasizing their efforts to advance science or its applications through research, teaching or other significant contributions. Fellows are elected every year, notable honorees being inventor Thomas Edison and astronomer Maria Mitchell. 

The honorees will be presented with an official certificate and a rosette pin, either gold for science or blue for engineering, at the AAAS Fellows Forum during the 2019 AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. on Feb. 16, 2019. 

One of the AAAS fellows is Girsh Blumberg, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Blumberg was distinguished by AAAS for his contributions to the field of spectroscopy, which studies the interaction between matter and electromagnetic radiation. He is most known for contributing to a spectroscopic technique called electronic Raman scattering in the system of electrons, superconductors and quantum spin systems. Blumberg has also co-authored more than 100 publications and has more than 30 patents. 

Another fellow is Masayori Inouye, a distinguished professor at the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, who was acknowledged by the AAAS for contributing to the understanding of the biology of E. coli. Inouye’s research focused particularly on gene regulation by a type of protein called antisense RNA. He also studied the role of toxin and antitoxin systems in the regulation of cells. 

Megerditch (Mike) Kiledjian, a distinguished professor and chair of the Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, was cited by AAAS for his contributions to advancements in the life sciences. His research focused on how messenger RNA (mRNA), a type of molecule which carries genetic information from DNA, functions and affects human disorders. 

The AAAS also honored Athina Petropulu, a distinguished professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, for applying signal processing to wireless communications and networking, the physical layer of communication systems and radar signal processing. Petropulu and her students used signaling and networks to overcome the challenges of interference, fading and eavesdropping brought by wireless technology. 

Finally, Scott Thomas, distinguished professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, was elected as a fellow by the AAAS for his contributions to particle physics, specifically supersymmetry and searching for physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. His recent research focused on a branch of theoretical physics called phenomenology, which is concerned with fundamental particles and their interactions. 

Founded in 1848, AAAS serves more than 10 million people and includes approximately 250 affiliated societies and academies of science.  


Catherine Nguyen

Catherine Nguyen is a School of Arts and Science first-year. She is a staff writer @ The Daily Targum. 


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