Islamic State wages terror across globe

Tribal fighters take part in an intensive security deployment against Islamic State militants in the town of Amriyat al-Falluja in Anbar province, November 5, 2014.   REUTERS/Stringer
Tribal fighters take part in an intensive security deployment against Islamic State militants in the town of Amriyat al-Falluja in Anbar province, November 5, 2014. REUTERS/Stringer

While domestic issues have occupied mainstream media in recent months, international conflicts have also received attention due to ongoing battles in the Middle East with the Islamic State.

The group, which began as an offshoot of established terrorist group al-Qaeda, currently controls swaths of territory in Syria and Iraq. 

It has become a central target for the United States, as the nation supports its former enemy state Iraq and Syria, a country in the middle of a civil war. In August, President Barack Obama authorized airstrikes on IS, attacking the group in September, according to CNN. 

IS has retaliated, killing five Western hostages since the beginning of the conflict, according to CNN. Several victims have been American journalists, including James Foley and Steven Sotloff. 

It is known for targeting religious minorities in Iraq. In May and June, Iraqi Kurds fought IS for control of their territory, Kurdistan. 

According to an article for The Daily Targum, Hamid-al-Bayati, a permanent representative of Iraq to the United Nations and a former Deputy Foreign Minister to the Republic of Iraq, spoke about the Iraqi turmoil on Nov. 18 at Rutgers.

“The media focuses on the negative side of the picture ... [I want them to] say what is good, say what is bad,” Al-Bayati said in the article. “[But they just] want to sell the news.”

He said IS is a hot-button issue and that the terrorist group was particularly extreme. 

“I teach my students how to think as leaders,” Al-Bayati said. “If we don’t unite as human [beings] … then there will be another generation of terrorism.”

IS has used websites and social media to promote their cause. They have posted hostage execution videos on YouTube, according to CNN.com. 

It also frequently uses social media outlets such as Twitter to recruit and inform the world of its dogmas, according to The Daily Beast.


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