HORU April 6, 2016


"I've known I wanted to get into journalism since I was 4 years old. I would always open up the newspaper even before I could read. And growing up, I knew I was good at writing and I knew I loved sports, so I knew early on that I should try and put the two together. In my first month here at Rutgers, following my mother's advice of course, I went to go work for The Daily Targum. My first beat was covering Women's Winter Track and Field, and I was excited to get involved. But when I was starting out, I had this mindset that I should've immediately been on the football beat, or that I should've been covering basketball. I was a little in over my head, but like anything else in life, you can get humbled really quick. I had to work for it. So after a year of experience working as a writer and as a paid correspondent, I ended up training for Sports Editor. I wanted it more than anything. It was a lot to juggle, and there were a lot of sleepless nights with how busy the football team was this past year, but at the same time it was all worth it. I look back on it now, and I realize that if I didn't have this place to start out, not only would my writing not be in the spot where it's at, but without getting the hands on experience, or dealing with media relations, I really don't know where I would be. I know now that as a journalist, I'm not going to be a sports editor coming right out of college. I'm not going to be a lead writer on a big beat. And that's fine. The first entry level job that I get might be doing a lot of the grunt work. But working for the Targum, and seeing those operations run, it all reassured me that this this is what I want to do, and that this is what I'm passionate about."


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