HORU October 28, 2016

<p>“Everything’s political. There’s politics in the workplace, there’s politics in the school place, and you have to know how to work your way around that. And I think that’s what political science really offers. There's the experience that comes from the real world implications. It’s a much more valuable skill, I think, than any so-called textbook learning; to go out there and learn how to persuade, social interaction, and when it comes down to business, how to get what you want. It’s mostly strategy, choice and it’s psychology, really; how to deal with people. I’ve worked in Trenton, I’ve run local campaigns, it’s dirty. And everybody’s dirty laundry is fair game, it’s out in the open. But a textbook can’t tell you what this guy’s next move is gonna be. A textbook can’t tell you how you should formulate your ground game, how you should come up with campaign points and target certain demographics. So that’s the way that I see it. There’s no way to learn that from any book, you know what I mean?”</p>

“Everything’s political. There’s politics in the workplace, there’s politics in the school place, and you have to know how to work your way around that. And I think that’s what political science really offers. There's the experience that comes from the real world implications. It’s a much more valuable skill, I think, than any so-called textbook learning; to go out there and learn how to persuade, social interaction, and when it comes down to business, how to get what you want. It’s mostly strategy, choice and it’s psychology, really; how to deal with people. I’ve worked in Trenton, I’ve run local campaigns, it’s dirty. And everybody’s dirty laundry is fair game, it’s out in the open. But a textbook can’t tell you what this guy’s next move is gonna be. A textbook can’t tell you how you should formulate your ground game, how you should come up with campaign points and target certain demographics. So that’s the way that I see it. There’s no way to learn that from any book, you know what I mean?”


“Everything’s political. There’s politics in the workplace, there’s politics in the school place, and you have to know how to work your way around that. And I think that’s what political science really offers. There's the experience that comes from the real world implications. It’s a much more valuable skill, I think, than any so-called textbook learning; to go out there and learn how to persuade, social interaction, and when it comes down to business, how to get what you want. It’s mostly strategy, choice and it’s psychology, really; how to deal with people. I’ve worked in Trenton, I’ve run local campaigns, it’s dirty. And everybody’s dirty laundry is fair game, it’s out in the open. But a textbook can’t tell you what this guy’s next move is gonna be. A textbook can’t tell you how you should formulate your ground game, how you should come up with campaign points and target certain demographics. So that’s the way that I see it. There’s no way to learn that from any book, you know what I mean?”


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