HORU October 8, 2016

<p>(3/3) "As a history major, I’ve been taught to question everything that you’re given. And to ask, ‘Who’s telling the story and what biases do they have? Why are they telling this story and whose story are we missing?’ And that’s the thing; so often in history classes, we’re missing the story. Most of the time, we’re taught from the white perspective or from the victor’s perspective. I think a lot of people feel helpless about the inequalities in our country and I, in a lot of ways, still feel very helpless myself. But I know that there’s something I can do about it, even if it's small. It's really exciting for me to look forward to the classes I’ll teach in the future and think, ‘I can use this type of primary source to tell this story, or I can point to a part of history and show that while the white men may have been on top, all of these other Americans were here too, and their stories matter just as much. It’s not just a white history, it’s everyone’s history.”</p>

(3/3) "As a history major, I’ve been taught to question everything that you’re given. And to ask, ‘Who’s telling the story and what biases do they have? Why are they telling this story and whose story are we missing?’ And that’s the thing; so often in history classes, we’re missing the story. Most of the time, we’re taught from the white perspective or from the victor’s perspective. I think a lot of people feel helpless about the inequalities in our country and I, in a lot of ways, still feel very helpless myself. But I know that there’s something I can do about it, even if it's small. It's really exciting for me to look forward to the classes I’ll teach in the future and think, ‘I can use this type of primary source to tell this story, or I can point to a part of history and show that while the white men may have been on top, all of these other Americans were here too, and their stories matter just as much. It’s not just a white history, it’s everyone’s history.”


(3/3) "As a history major, I’ve been taught to question everything that you’re given. And to ask, ‘Who’s telling the story and what biases do they have? Why are they telling this story and whose story are we missing?’ And that’s the thing; so often in history classes, we’re missing the story. Most of the time, we’re taught from the white perspective or from the victor’s perspective. I think a lot of people feel helpless about the inequalities in our country and I, in a lot of ways, still feel very helpless myself. But I know that there’s something I can do about it, even if it's small. It's really exciting for me to look forward to the classes I’ll teach in the future and think, ‘I can use this type of primary source to tell this story, or I can point to a part of history and show that while the white men may have been on top, all of these other Americans were here too, and their stories matter just as much. It’s not just a white history, it’s everyone’s history.”


Comments powered by Disqus

Please note All comments are eligible for publication in The Daily Targum.

Support Independent Student Journalism

Your donation helps support independent student journalists of all backgrounds research and cover issues that are important to the entire Rutgers community. All donations are tax deductible.