HORU October 8, 2016

<p>(2/3) “Now I’m in the Graduate School of Education and we’re having these discussions all over again in a lot of my classes; about race and religion and inequalities in our country and in our school systems. And I’ve realized that I had a totally different education than a lot of my classmates. Often I didn’t learn history from the white perspective. I was introduced to the civil war not through Abraham Lincoln but through Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. I read these incredible stories of human beings who lived their lives and overcame obstacles. I was fascinated by these stories. And so I was being taught this very important part of American history, not through the view of the oppressor but from the view of those who overcame. I remember feeling passionate about this from a young age, but was still very ignorant to the racism that exists today. And I think I still believed that it existed, but I didn’t know what it looked like. And I didn’t know how it was affecting me.”</p>

(2/3) “Now I’m in the Graduate School of Education and we’re having these discussions all over again in a lot of my classes; about race and religion and inequalities in our country and in our school systems. And I’ve realized that I had a totally different education than a lot of my classmates. Often I didn’t learn history from the white perspective. I was introduced to the civil war not through Abraham Lincoln but through Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. I read these incredible stories of human beings who lived their lives and overcame obstacles. I was fascinated by these stories. And so I was being taught this very important part of American history, not through the view of the oppressor but from the view of those who overcame. I remember feeling passionate about this from a young age, but was still very ignorant to the racism that exists today. And I think I still believed that it existed, but I didn’t know what it looked like. And I didn’t know how it was affecting me.”


(2/3) “Now I’m in the Graduate School of Education and we’re having these discussions all over again in a lot of my classes; about race and religion and inequalities in our country and in our school systems. And I’ve realized that I had a totally different education than a lot of my classmates. Often I didn’t learn history from the white perspective. I was introduced to the civil war not through Abraham Lincoln but through Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad. I read these incredible stories of human beings who lived their lives and overcame obstacles. I was fascinated by these stories. And so I was being taught this very important part of American history, not through the view of the oppressor but from the view of those who overcame. I remember feeling passionate about this from a young age, but was still very ignorant to the racism that exists today. And I think I still believed that it existed, but I didn’t know what it looked like. And I didn’t know how it was affecting me.”


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