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HORU January 13, 2017

<p>“I am a first generation, Muslim-American, born and raised here. My parents are both immigrants, my dad from Egypt and my mom from Syria, coming to the U.S. to seek a better life for me and my siblings. Despite what we tend to hear about in the news, I think with my identity as a Muslim and an American, beliefs are one in the same; standing for justice, freedom, and hard work. Those are all things that my religion preaches. My religion stands side by side with American values, preaching respect to my neighbors, regardless of their faith, and that’s why I think it’s easy to be a Muslim in America. Because of the rhetoric we hear today, it makes it more difficult to outwardly represent that, because you are often immediately stereotyped as a Muslim. But I think we can only go up from here. Minorities are now understanding more and more that we need to stand together. And in my opinion, an overall sense of togetherness is a great foundation that will help us be unstoppable in the future.”</p>

“I am a first generation, Muslim-American, born and raised here. My parents are both immigrants, my dad from Egypt and my mom from Syria, coming to the U.S. to seek a better life for me and my siblings. Despite what we tend to hear about in the news, I think with my identity as a Muslim and an American, beliefs are one in the same; standing for justice, freedom, and hard work. Those are all things that my religion preaches. My religion stands side by side with American values, preaching respect to my neighbors, regardless of their faith, and that’s why I think it’s easy to be a Muslim in America. Because of the rhetoric we hear today, it makes it more difficult to outwardly represent that, because you are often immediately stereotyped as a Muslim. But I think we can only go up from here. Minorities are now understanding more and more that we need to stand together. And in my opinion, an overall sense of togetherness is a great foundation that will help us be unstoppable in the future.”


“I am a first generation, Muslim-American, born and raised here. My parents are both immigrants, my dad from Egypt and my mom from Syria, coming to the U.S. to seek a better life for me and my siblings. Despite what we tend to hear about in the news, I think with my identity as a Muslim and an American, beliefs are one in the same; standing for justice, freedom, and hard work. Those are all things that my religion preaches. My religion stands side by side with American values, preaching respect to my neighbors, regardless of their faith, and that’s why I think it’s easy to be a Muslim in America. Because of the rhetoric we hear today, it makes it more difficult to outwardly represent that, because you are often immediately stereotyped as a Muslim. But I think we can only go up from here. Minorities are now understanding more and more that we need to stand together. And in my opinion, an overall sense of togetherness is a great foundation that will help us be unstoppable in the future.”


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