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HORU February 1, 2017

<p>(2/2) “For me, being a Muslim American is being someone who is able to have the best of both worlds. Someone who is able to express her faith and believe in it, follow the Tenets of Islam, and live my life according to Islam; but also to be someone who is American, who has the opportunities that I have, who cares about democracy, freedom of speech, and freedom of religion. It means that I am someone who has seen the government do amazing things and awful things. But at least I have a say in that government and that participation. I am someone who has seen a country made up of dreamers, and those who are able to execute their dreams because our country has opened their arms to immigrants and people from all over the world. We are a country full of diversity that you don’t really see anywhere else.</p><p>This is my home. I’m a Jersey girl. I will always love Jersey diners and Jersey bagels in the morning, but I’ll also be fasting during Ramadan. And that’s what being a Muslim American is really all about; you take traditions from both places and you own it. So for me, I get to have both sides, and I wear it on my sleeve every single day. And I will never stop being proud of being a Muslim American.”</p>

(2/2) “For me, being a Muslim American is being someone who is able to have the best of both worlds. Someone who is able to express her faith and believe in it, follow the Tenets of Islam, and live my life according to Islam; but also to be someone who is American, who has the opportunities that I have, who cares about democracy, freedom of speech, and freedom of religion. It means that I am someone who has seen the government do amazing things and awful things. But at least I have a say in that government and that participation. I am someone who has seen a country made up of dreamers, and those who are able to execute their dreams because our country has opened their arms to immigrants and people from all over the world. We are a country full of diversity that you don’t really see anywhere else.

This is my home. I’m a Jersey girl. I will always love Jersey diners and Jersey bagels in the morning, but I’ll also be fasting during Ramadan. And that’s what being a Muslim American is really all about; you take traditions from both places and you own it. So for me, I get to have both sides, and I wear it on my sleeve every single day. And I will never stop being proud of being a Muslim American.”


(2/2) “For me, being a Muslim American is being someone who is able to have the best of both worlds. Someone who is able to express her faith and believe in it, follow the Tenets of Islam, and live my life according to Islam; but also to be someone who is American, who has the opportunities that I have, who cares about democracy, freedom of speech, and freedom of religion. It means that I am someone who has seen the government do amazing things and awful things. But at least I have a say in that government and that participation. I am someone who has seen a country made up of dreamers, and those who are able to execute their dreams because our country has opened their arms to immigrants and people from all over the world. We are a country full of diversity that you don’t really see anywhere else.

This is my home. I’m a Jersey girl. I will always love Jersey diners and Jersey bagels in the morning, but I’ll also be fasting during Ramadan. And that’s what being a Muslim American is really all about; you take traditions from both places and you own it. So for me, I get to have both sides, and I wear it on my sleeve every single day. And I will never stop being proud of being a Muslim American.”


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