September 23, 2019 | 70° F

HORU April 1, 2017


izzywarriorprincessdm
Photo by Humans of Rutgers and Jeremy Berkowitz |

“In September of 2014, Isabel (we call her Izzy Warrior Princess) was diagnosed with a spinal chord tumor. She finished chemo in January of 2016, so she’s been a year chemo free and her tumor is still stable. Originally, she had to get a biopsy. They had to take a little piece of the tumor out and that left her in really bad shape. A year ago, when we were at Dance Marathon, she was in her walker and couldn’t walk on her own. But I said last year that this Dance Marathon, she’ll be dancing and she’ll be up there on the stage on her own, and sure enough, she did it. For her to be dancing today, it means more than anybody would ever know if you haven't seen this whole journey. I don’t know what the future brings for Isabel, I don’t know what her disability is going to be like, I don’t know how people will treat her. But she has our support always. And beyond that, she has this tremendous community. If ever she feels alone, all she has to do is remember how many people have been there with her through the very very worst, and who are cheering her on at every milestone. And that’s what this is about. It’s about hope. Once you lose hope, you lose your fight. And we refuse to give up hope.”


“In September of 2014, Isabel (we call her Izzy Warrior Princess) was diagnosed with a spinal chord tumor. She finished chemo in January of 2016, so she’s been a year chemo free and her tumor is still stable. Originally, she had to get a biopsy. They had to take a little piece of the tumor out and that left her in really bad shape. A year ago, when we were at Dance Marathon, she was in her walker and couldn’t walk on her own. But I said last year that this Dance Marathon, she’ll be dancing and she’ll be up there on the stage on her own, and sure enough, she did it. For her to be dancing today, it means more than anybody would ever know if you haven't seen this whole journey. I don’t know what the future brings for Isabel, I don’t know what her disability is going to be like, I don’t know how people will treat her. But she has our support always. And beyond that, she has this tremendous community. If ever she feels alone, all she has to do is remember how many people have been there with her through the very very worst, and who are cheering her on at every milestone. And that’s what this is about. It’s about hope. Once you lose hope, you lose your fight. And we refuse to give up hope.”


Humans of Rutgers

Jeremy Berkowitz

Comments powered by Disqus

Please note All comments are eligible for publication in The Daily Targum.