Bending organic semiconductor can benefit next-generation electronics, Rutgers study finds

<p>Associate professor in the Department of Physics Vitaly Podzorov and former post-doctoral student Hee Taek Yi look at flexible electronics.</p>

Associate professor in the Department of Physics Vitaly Podzorov and former post-doctoral student Hee Taek Yi look at flexible electronics.


A Rutgers-led study has found that next-generation electronics, such as sensors and solar cells, may benefit from slightly bending semiconductors made of organic material that can double the speed of electricity flow, according to an article on Rutgers Today.

The study, which was published in the journal "Advanced Science," found that this behavior cannot be easily achieved with traditional semiconductors made from materials such as silicon, according to the article.

“If implemented in electrical circuits, such as enhancement — achieved by very slight bending — would mean a major leap toward realizing next-generation, high-performance organic electronics,” said senior author Vitaly Podzorov, a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, according to the article.

There are materials in semiconductors that conduct electricity, which can be altered by different external stimuli, according to the article. This makes them essential for electronics.

Organic semiconductors are made of flexible crystals known as Van der Waals molecular crystals, which form light, according to the article. As opposed to traditional semiconductors, they are able to be applied to optoelectronics, which harness light. These include flexible and printed electronics, sensors and solar cells.

This study reported the first measurement of how bending organic semiconductors may affect the speed of electricity flowing through them, according to the article. A 1% bend can approximately double the speed of the electron flow. 


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