'BoJack Horseman' new season won't disappoint


At the end of this month, the seminal, emotional roller coaster of the Netflix original series “BoJack Horseman” bids a solemn farewell on Jan. 31, as the final half of season six is released.

Before the series takes its final curtain call, reflections must be made on its incredible character development, impactful writing and the lasting legacy of a show so unique in its approach and storytelling. 

The show has captivated audiences throughout its six seasons, and it differs from similar shows of its era in its decision to know when to end. Many shows continue far past their prime, and force themselves onto American culture when their usefulness has long been overused. 

By ending at the right time, “BoJack Horseman” is able to cement itself as an impactful piece of television show in American culture, by wrapping up its story in a way that does not seem overblown or ingenuine. 

Shows such as “The Simpsons” are primarily immortalized by the brilliance and heart of their first eight seasons and vilified for their decrease in quality over time. 

“BoJack Horseman” is taking the route which prioritizes quality over quantity, a rare occurrence in television.

One of the greatest strengths of “BoJack Horseman” is its depiction of brilliantly flawed characters. The titular character is a self-loathing anthropomorphic horse who starred in a sitcom but is well beyond the prime of his career when the show takes place. 

While the character descriptions may sound outlandish on paper, the show allows you to both empathize and understand these characters without characterizing them by tropes or cliches. 

In an era where television shows and animated series are rifled with stereotypes and one-dimensional character scripts, “BoJack Horseman” portrays a story where the characters are complex, and often make decisions that are both self-destructive and non-conventional. 

These characteristics are what relates to our humanity and relatability. Their actions defy both stereotypes and typical character decisions.

Within most animated television shows, especially those geared toward children, the actions that the characters commit have essentially no consequence in relation to the story. The entirety of the plot and the problems presented are neatly solved in a standard 22-minute runtime. 

No matter how disastrous the situation, the characters and the setting start and end in the same way. Most other television shows do not show the continuity of their storyline or how their characters interact based on this continuation of storytelling.

“BoJack Horseman” subverts this major facet of animated television because much of the plot of the show is about consequences: Previous actions and episodes are constantly referenced, and the characters’ relationships with one another change due to the choices they make. 

Characters who were close consistently end up drifting apart due to the choices they make, and this allows the show to dive into complex yet entertaining situations

My predictions for the second half of season six are that I believe many different plot points from earlier seasons will be wrapped up, and the character development and changes we have seen from characters such as BoJack, Todd Chavez and Diane Nguyen will culminate in an excellent and satisfying conclusion. 

I believe that BoJack will be punished for his actions toward Penny and Charlotte Carson, and the circumstances about Sarah Lynn and BoJack will be released to the public. 

I also believe that BoJack’s growth from rehab will continue to impact his character and he will eventually atone for his actions. 

Many animated shows have been made, but none in recent memory have evoked as much emotion or reflection in one’s character than “BoJack Horseman.” 

Raphael Bob-Waksberg and his team have assembled writers who can create depth in their characters and constant entertainment in the balance between comedy and tragedy.  

“BoJack Horseman” should be remembered as a show that combines brilliant storytelling and fascinating characters to create a unique experience for its viewers.


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