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Childhood shows you totally forgot about

<p>"Oswald" is a childhood television series that aired for one season. The main character is voiced by Fred Savage actor from the popular late 80s show "The Wonder Years."&nbsp;</p>

"Oswald" is a childhood television series that aired for one season. The main character is voiced by Fred Savage actor from the popular late 80s show "The Wonder Years." 


Reminiscing on memories always makes me feel better during difficult times. What made my childhood so amazing were the television shows I would watch Saturday mornings or when I got home from school. 

Here's a list of television shows that we all use to love but maybe have forgotten about. 

"Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends" 

"Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends" aired on Cartoon Network from 2004 to 2009. It followed the daily lives of lost or forgotten imaginary friends living together in a mansion owned by Madame Foster. 

The show was so creative and imaginative. You could create a new character for the show by imagining it. What I loved the most was Max’s relationship with his imaginary friend, Bloo. We might have not noticed it when we were younger but it shows us that you don’t have to be in a rush to grow up. 

"Postcards from Buster"

"Arthur" is my favorite childhood show to this day. The creators eventually made a spin-off called "Postcards from Buster" in 2004. If you watched "Arthur," you know that Buster's dad was a pilot, and in the spin-off, Buster spends time with his dad traveling all across the world. 

Shows like this were always so cool because they showed you artifacts and cuisine from across the world. Buster was the travel goal before any of your favorite travel social media influencers were around. I remember episodes where he traveled to New Orleans, Philadelphia, Chicago and Mount Rushmore, and there's no kids show quite like it. 

"Zoboomafoo" 

In 2010 there was a spin-off of the show  "Zoboomafoo" called "The Wild Kratts" but nothing competes with the original. Brothers Martin and Chris Kratt starred in the show with their lemur buddy, Zoboomafoo, teaching kids how to care for and respect animals. 

The show was set in Animal Junction, a watering hole that was an animal pit stop for creatures around the globe. My favorite part of the show was at the beginning where Zoboomafoo went from being a regular lemur to a lemur who could talk, sing and dance after you fed him. This show was so special because it taught you about fascinating animals that you’d probably never see in your daily life. 

"Oswald"

Can you believe that "Oswald" only ran for one season? The first episode aired in 2003 on networks like Noggin, Treehouse TV, Nickelodeon and Nick Jr. Oswald was an octopus who lived in the big city with his wiener dog, Weenie. No other cartoon character out there can trump how kind and selfless Oswald was, not even Winnie the Pooh. 

In each episode, I remember him doing whatever he could to help out his friends and neighbors. Whenever I watched his show I remember feeling so at peace and relaxed. 

"Yin Yang Yo!"

If you were around for the Jetix era then you have to remember "Yin Yang Yo." "Yin Yang Yo" was about two young rabbits who studied martial arts from their panda bear teacher in hopes of becoming Woo Foo knights to help save the world. 

I specifically remember this being one of the shows my brother and I would bond over. The theme song was so catchy and the martial arts moves were so cool. The media does not always convey accurate representations of certain cultures. But I do think that it is capable of vaguely introducing people to something outside of their norm. Growing up with shows like "Yin Yang Yo" is what I think makes some children more open to learning different perspectives as they get older. 


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