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Week in review: Laurels and Darts

(11/30/12 5:00am)

Cramped quarters? No study time? Procrastination nation? We’ve all been there, but the University is not to blame. Between an impromptu “Frankenstorm” weeklong break and ample study time in the weeks leading up to finals, the consensus remains: Facilities are fair. Even Tillett Hall has remained open, despite recent plans for renovation by spring 2013. If you’ve got finals problems, we’ve got a dart for you, son. We got 99 problems, but a study space ain’t one.


Moving from appointed to elected boards

(11/29/12 5:00am)

For the past two weeks, New Brunswick residents have eagerly awaited the results of a contentious Nov. 6 ballot question that would determine whether New Brunswick’s eight-member school board would be appointed by Mayor James Cahill — as it has been for the duration of the board’s existence — or elected by the city’s residents themselves. Strenuous campaigning by both the mayor, who largely opposed the measure, and a group of city residents and students who supported it brought the issue to ride on a handful of votes. At the closing of the polls on Nov. 6, just 13 votes separated the measure from passing.



Protests are part of bigger picture

(11/28/12 5:00am)

Pro-peace rallies for both Israel and Palestine occupied the steps of Brower Commons last week, incited by the recent spike in violence overseas. On a college campus thousands of miles from the soil upon which the conflict took place, more than a few students invariably found the displays of public activism reactionary and, as others argued, downright annoying. And if carried out in isolation, they may very well have been.


Bongiovi overdose reinforces need for law

(11/27/12 5:00am)

Nineteen-year-old Stephanie Bongiovi — daughter to New Jersey rock superstar Jon Bon Jovi — was taken to a nearby New York hospital earlier this month after overdosing on heroine in her Hamilton College residence hall. The incident, involving the daughter of a well-known celebrity, invariably made headlines across the state. But the most important implications of Bongiovi’s overdose involve a New York state law — referred to as the 911 Good Samaritan Law — that spared the teen from criminal drug charges and possible further harm.



Week marks milestones for U. community

(11/26/12 5:00am)

In a mad rush to pack up and get home for Thanksgiving break last week, University students may have overlooked what was two of the University’s most historic developments in recent years. One concerns the University’s standing as a comprehensive, research-intensive N.J. public institution, and the other its reputation as home to a respectable and self-sustaining athletic program.


Week marks milestones for U. community

(11/26/12 5:00am)

In a mad rush to pack up and get home for Thanksgiving break last week, University students may have overlooked what was two of the University’s most historic developments in recent years. One concerns the University’s standing as a comprehensive, research-intensive N.J. public institution, and the other its reputation as home to a respectable and self-sustaining athletic program.


RUSAS should use better protest tactics

(11/26/12 5:00am)

Rutgers United Students Against Sweatshops, a University organization dedicated to fighting labor malpractices, has employed some interesting tactics over the past few years in its campaign to bring about social and economic justice on campus and abroad. From a premature Fair Labor Association withdrawal party in the Red Lion Cafe last semester to organizing an educational boot camp for student leaders from schools up and down the east coast this semester, the group’s endeavors have been, if not always effective, certainly attention-warranting. But its RUSAS’ latest venture that really, truly takes the cake. It should also serve to show that shock-and-awe tactics may not be the most appropriate way to have one’s voice heard.


RUSAS should use better protest tactics

(11/26/12 5:00am)

Rutgers United Students Against Sweatshops, a University organization dedicated to fighting labor malpractices, has employed some interesting tactics over the past few years in its campaign to bring about social and economic justice on campus and abroad. From a premature Fair Labor Association withdrawal party in the Red Lion Cafe last semester to organizing an educational boot camp for student leaders from schools up and down the east coast this semester, the group’s endeavors have been, if not always effective, certainly attention-warranting. But its RUSAS’ latest venture that really, truly takes the cake. It should also serve to show that shock-and-awe tactics may not be the most appropriate way to have one’s voice heard.


Daily review: Laurels and Darts

(11/19/12 5:00am)

Just when we think we can’t go on, Thanksgiving arrives. The only thing that makes us more excited for the upcoming break than the inhuman amounts of cranberry sauce and turkey we’re about to consume is the equally inhuman amounts of midterm studying and coursework we’re not about to consume. A laurel to Thanksgiving break for relieving us of our semesterly duties. We only wish the scrooges in charge would afford us a few more days of pigging out.


Smith underlines inanity of senate courtesy

(11/19/12 5:00am)

Martin Perez, a New Jersey Latino activist and attorney should — per a nomination by Gov. Chris Christie 18 months ago — be actively serving on the University’s Board of Governors. Today, state Sen. Bob Smith and other democratic lawmakers are — per an unwritten political custom the in United States called “senatorial courtesy,” which defers authority for political appointments in the state to local senators if a senator from the nominee’s home-county or district opposes the nomination — preventing that from happening.


Wekk-in review: Laurels and Darts

(11/16/12 5:00am)

Thousands of University students could be heard banging their heads against their keyboards this week as they all simultaneously battled with that gargantuan cyber-beast called “WebReg.” The process of registering for classes never fails to unnerve us, and so we’ll never hesitate to complain about it. To expend a little frustration, we dart registration week and all the hair-pulling, nail-biting and keyboard-smashing that it brings.


Don’t take petitions to secede seriously

(11/15/12 5:00am)

A resident from Sewell, N.J., has recently proposed that the state of New Jersey secede from the rest of the country. According to nj.com, the man has filed the petition with the White House’s “We the People” website in order for New Jersey to “peacefully grant the State of New Jersey to withdraw from the United States of America to create its own NEW government.” We haven’t talked to the guy, but this seems to us like a pretty awful idea.


Take steps to prevent future violence

(11/15/12 5:00am)

For the third time in less than two months, downtown New Brunswick has served as the locale of yet another violent killing, after a 24-year-old city resident named Joshua Negron was shot to death Monday night near Hale Street. It’s obvious to us that the increased occurrence of extreme violence in these locations should serve as a wake-up call to city administrators and local police forces to increase supervision of the city’s most dangerous areas.


Giving back during times of crisis

(11/14/12 5:00am)

Amidst the onset of the holidays and in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, residents along the east coast — and students at the University being among them — may be wondering how and where they can volunteer their energies or donate their resources in the coming weeks. Cleanup efforts for Hurricane Sandy are still in full swing, and wading through the multitude of humanitarian and nonprofit relief organizations available to those looking to donate can easily overwhelm. Indeed, the choice can be a difficult one. With this in mind, The Daily Targum’s editorial board took a look at the options students have available to give back.


New grade policy gives students break

(11/13/12 5:00am)

Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Richard L. Edwards sent out a campus-wide email on Saturday to the University community detailing the implementation on an emergency academic policy change for those students whose lives have been severely affected by Hurricane Sandy. According to the email, the University is enacting a “one-time policy that will allow undergraduate and pre-professional students adversely impacted by the hurricane to have their Fall 2012 course grades converted to Pass/No Credit.” Students who have faced hardships in the wake of the storm and whose coursework has suffered because of it have until midnight on Monday, Nov. 19 to file a Grade Conversion Application with the University to have their grades changed. Surprised? Us too.


In-state tuition for the undocumented

(11/13/12 5:00am)

Members of the organization New Jersey United Students are making the necessary efforts to support a bill that would guarantee in-state tuition for undocumented residents. As fellow students and New Jersey residents, we find it difficult to see why someone could deny in-state tuition to a student who grew up in the state, even if their citizenship is not defined or documented.



Week-in review: laurels and darts

(11/09/12 5:00am)

After a short bye, the Scarlet Knights football team is back in it. Rutgers plays Army at High Point Solutions Stadium on Saturday, and has a bit of catching up to do. The Knights lost, as most of us know, against Kent State two weeks ago during Homecoming. The loss was slightly disappointing, but we still have faith. A laurel to the Knights for their upcoming game. Make us shine.