Humans of Rutgers

"He's a seeing-eye puppy, and there's a club on campus called Rutgers University Seeing-Eye Puppy Raisers and we have about 10 dogs on campus right now."
"Why do you think it's important for people like you to sit dogs like this?"
"Well they used to have seeing-eye dogs in kennels, and it wasn't really great for the dogs because they breed them. So between 7 weeks and about a year, they can't really do any serious training because they're too young. So they'd mostly be in the kennels and they just don't have the one-on-one time that they do with a family, or someone at Rutgers where they can really bring them just about everywhere. So that allows the dogs to be well suited to be out in the world. That's one of the biggest things we do, just socialize the dogs and make sure that they have a good home and that they trust people. And I've met the people that have the dogs, and how they describe it, getting the dog after being on a cane; it's freedom."


"One time in high school, after a party, me and this girl snuck into a construction site and had sex in the scoop of a bulldozer."
- Secrets from the Sole

"At the start of the year, I was in my dorm room watching the Bishop T.D. Jakes and I felt really empty and I didn't know why. And he was saying if you want to stop doing something, then worship the Lord. So I started listening to worship music all the time and I stopped drinking alcohol that week, and I didn't feel obligated to do it, I didn't feel obligated to go out. I'm a people pleaser too, I tend to try and please people and kind of forget about myself in the process. So I was in my dorm room bawling my eyes out, crying like 'God, teach me the word of God, help me utilize the Bible in my life. I want to give my life to you.' So that week I ran into a student organization here at Rutgers called Disciples on Campus and I studied the bible with them, and I got baptized again. I'm not with them anymore, but I still love God. I read my bible everyday."
"So all of this happened just recently for you?"
"Before college, I believed in Jesus but I didn't live for him. I believed he was my savior, but he wasn't my Lord. I didn't allow him to dictate everything that I did. I was trying to handle life on my own. But He's living through me, I'm His vessel so that people can see Him through me.
At first, I was reading my bible every day and I thought it was difficult, like I just didn't have the time. But you have the time. You have to make your own time. So when I started reading the bible, it started changing me and the way I think and my heart got soft. And my heart was really hard. And I was rude. It just changed the way I look at life, the way I look at people, the way I treat people, talk to people, and what I do with my time. It's just an amazing experience. Every day I read my bible, just to get my day started; To devote my time to Him, and let Him give me the right perspective throughout the day. It really gives me an inexpressible joy. And I know it's so abstract, and I understand why people don't believe, but when you are in it, when you experience it, you understand."

"I'm interested in working with special needs kids. You know, kids that have developmental disorders or mental disorders and like early intervention. And a lot of parents deny that their kids have any kind of problems and that's terrible because then they grow up and they're 12 or 13 and they're, you know, off the wall, or confused or conflicted and it could've been solved or helped when they were younger. So I want to do that."
"What made you interested in helping kids like that?"
"Well my brother actually has Downs Syndrome. And growing up with an older brother with Downs Syndrome is kind of hard, but I see how that early intervention that my mom did, and like having the therapist come and work with him when he was younger really helped him become so high-functioning. He was actually in a program where he went to a regular high school and he was only in a couple classes like the Math classes and Language Arts with the special needs kids, but he was in Gym and all the other classes with everyone and that helped him a lot too. I've also worked a lot with Autistic kids at the Karate school that I work at. And Karate teaches a lot of discipline and it also helps them really get out of their shell because we make them stand up and talk in front of everybody, or make them demonstrate in front of a class of 30 kids. It really helps their confidence as well, like if they can do this then they can speak in front of their class or they can stand up to bullies."

"I've been dating my girlfriend since high school and she's the only girl I've ever kissed."
- Secrets from the Sole

"I want to own my own gymnasium one day. That's a big goal for me. My mindset is working independently, working for me, so I want to do it with something I enjoy doing. And exercising, in general, I got into because of my cousin actually. He used to push me, tell me 'Let's go to the gym, let's go to the gym,' but I used to always be on the basketball court playing. And then one day, this bigger guy was playing with me and he was pushing me around and I thought, 'You know what? I have to go to the gym.'"
"So you want to work for yourself?"
"Yeah. I mean working independently has always been on my mind because my father has his own corner stores, so I've always had that example, that person to look up to. So I kind of want to do the same thing."

"What's something that not many people know about you?"
"I can read upside down at the same speed I can read normally. At first, I started reading upside down because I read like at least 20 words in advance of how I'm speaking. So I started reading upside down when I'm reading outloud or saying a speech because it would slow me down. But then I did it so often that I pretty much just caught up."

"I used to lie about never having Chipotle. It got me free food because my friends always felt obligated to buy me Chipotle for the 'first time'"
- Secrets from the Sole

"I'm actually an engineer, but I'm minoring in Japanese and I'm drawing a manga for my Japanese project. Not a lot of people who know me casually, know that I do actually draw like a lot."
"What do you like best about drawing?"
"For me, it's just kind of so different from engineering, because when you're in that mode of thinking about Math and numbers, logically this is always correct, you know? When you derive something, there's always like one correct answer. With art, there's so many different interpretations of it and I like the freedom that it gives me to do all that, and at the same time, kind of better myself in a way that not too many people would expect from like a mathy, sciencey dude."

"Two weeks ago, I drank so much wine that I peed my bed and blamed it on my cat."
- Secrets from the Sole

"My great-grandma is almost 102. She has four children who each had like two children and I'm great-grandchild number one. Now she has four. She came from China, where at points they were eating bark and grass, and now she's here and she has all this family and all these children and grandchildren and great-grandchildren and I'm just really happy for her. She's really proud of all of us."
"Almost 102 right? How do you think she's lived so long?"
"I mean when she was younger she did exercise... but I think the fact that she has so much family and we all see eachother a lot, that's something to stay for."

Introducing... "Secrets from the Sole";
A segment that we are excited about bringing to our page. While Humans of Rutgers University is really all about the people and diversity of the Rutgers community, we believe this segment will be a fun addition to the page where people from all around Rutgers can reveal something a little more personal or intimate about themselves in a new and interesting way. A bit of who you are comes out in what you wear and how you present yourself, so with this unique perspective on things, once a week, people from the Rutgers community can display who they are and something about themselves through Secrets from the Sole. Look out for more to come!

"I'm in love with a girl I met online."

"What's your New Year's resolution?"
"To be happy, I guess. For my family and friends to be happy."
"How do you think you can fulfill your resolution?"
"Live simply."

"If you could give advice to a large group of people, what would it be?"
"Take things more seriously. Everything's a game here to everybody and it's really not supposed to be. You know, your time here is money in the bank, at least you're supposed to think of it that way. This is an investment. It's an investment in yourself, and in your society, really. And to squander that on beer pong and all the other simple distracting entertainments that, you know, half of these kids waste their time on everyday you're flushing your money down the drain. This is money in the bank, you should take things seriously because you get to cash in when you're done. It shouldn't be like 'Hooray, high school part two!' or trying to make spring break last as long as it can; not that I'm against fun or anything like that, but honestly take care of your shit, before anything. Do your job."

"What's something you've been struggling with lately?"
"Finals. So I came out here. Basketball helps me relieve stress, takes everything off my mind."
"How long have you been playing basketball?"
"My whole life, I grew up watching my brother so.... I love this sport. Keeps me calm, keeps me active."

"We broke up for a day."
"No, less than 12 hours."
"And ever since then we've been in a crazy honeymoon phase."

"I run an organization called Our Fairy Godmother. I came up with this idea for a Prom Dress Drop my junior year of high school when I almost couldn't go to prom and a lot of girls were like, 'Oh I don't know if I can go, it's so expensive.' The dress, the ticket, the hair and makeup, there's just so much money that goes into it and I actually ended up borrowing a dress and realized there are so many girls who go to prom, buy this expensive, extravagant dress and just leave it in their closet. So I thought why not start a dress collection where they can donate the dress.
I wanted everyone to be involved so I contacted some schools in South Jersey, wrote them a letter asking, you know, 'Could you ask your students if they have dresses.' So what happens is, I pick up all the dresses after they collect it all and I host an event, and it's open to anyone and everyone, where I sell these dresses, for back then which was $10. And I make all this money so as an incentive, if you collect the most dresses, you get all the money and you can offset prices for you own school prom or use it for a different goal. If people want to collect as an organization they can do that too. Last year, Phi Delta Chi, they collected 142 dresses and we made $1,300 from dress sales and I gave that all to them, and they donated that to the Embrace Kids Foundation."
"Why do you think it's important for you to do this for people?"
"If you can't afford prom, there's definitely other things you can't afford and that you're missing out on, and I want to be able to give these girls an opportunity to miss out on one less thing."

www.ourfairygodmother.org

"Me and my friends are helping students cope with finals stress!"

"What's something you've been struggling with, other than tire pressure?"
"I've got a final paper that's like 20 pages long on yogurt. I don't care about yogurt."

"No justice, no peace. No racist police."