opinion

OPINION

Protesters remind Rutgers of Condoleezza Rice's war crimes

Condoleezza Rice made the proper decision to back out of an invitation by Rutgers University to receive $35,000 in return for a commencement address. The protesting students and faculty also were wise to remind the University that as National Security Advisor to President George W. Bush, she participated in the massive war crimes of the illegal and devastating invasion of Iraq — a nation that never threatened us.

OPINION

A PSA to college-aged men this Valentine’s Day

The beast has reared its ugly head once again — and no, I’m not referring to the snow or the unloved dog with two noses making its way around the Internet. Valentine’s Day is upon us, and I know this because I walked into a drug store recently and had my eyes assaulted by the heinous tokens of American commercialism Hallmark would call “gifts for your valentine.”

OPINION

Letters Policy

Due to space limitations, submissions cannot exceed 750 words. If a commentary exceeds 750 words, it will not be considered for publication. All authors must include name, phone number, class year and college affiliation or department to be considered for publication. Anonymous letters will not be considered. All submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity. A submission does not guarantee publication. Please submit via email to oped@dailytargum.com by 4 p.m. to be considered for the following day's publication. Please do not send submissions from Yahoo or Hotmail accounts.

OPINION

Editorial Policy

The editorials above represent the majority opinion of The Daily Targum's editorial board. All other opinions expressed on the Opinions page, and those held by advertisers, columnists and cartoonists, are not necessarily those of The Daily Targum.

OPINION

Rutgers Hillel issues statement on Westboro Baptist Church protest

The Westboro Baptist Church is an extremist organization that espouses the most despicable forms of anti-Semitic hate speech. Rutgers Hillel abhors their message, which is based entirely on condemning and attacking not only Jews, but homosexuals, Catholics, and other Christian denominations. They even protest the funerals of American serviceman. They have no decency.

OPINION

Quarter-life crisis hits hard

I could practically be a middle-aged, overweight and balding man on his first poorly rationalized venture into a motorcycle shop — or at least I feel that way. The phenomenon long mocked as the "midlife crisis" doesn't seem to require you be in your midlife at all, and it seems to have descended upon me in all its fury.

OPINION

"Fall" in love with Rutgers

Some University students are returning for yet another year and know just what to expect. Others are here for the first time, fresh-faced and doe-eyed. Among our mash-up, some are married, some partnered or single and loving it. Others, meanwhile, are completely overwhelmed by this vast new dating pool.

OPINION

Economy's effect on local business

I am a recent Rutgers College graduate and the owner of Better Than Mom's, a laundry and dry cleaning delivery service that caters to Rutgers students, New Brunswick professionals and other businesses in the surrounding area. During the Spring 2009 semester, we have experienced aggressive growth uncharacteristic of the business. While the growth of Better Than Mom's over the past two years is credible to an original and smart business plan, I would credit the unexpected rise in business this semester to our revolutionary (for the laundry service business) flat-rate pricing. The truth is, Better Than Mom's has achieved this record growth despite the recession our country faces.

OPINION

Choice over rule of law

I'm glad the new administration has placed newfound emphasis on the right to choose. I am glad former President George W. Bush's categorical enforcement of personal maxims that don't have the slightest connection to morality, whether inherent or transferred, is being done away with.

OPINION

Parents not pleased with sex article in paper

School newspapers are a good way to introduce students to the world of journalism.  They will learn many things including how to write a story, conduct an interview and engage the public with interesting investigative stories about their school and community.  But most importantly, the learning experience also exposes you to a world where free speech doesn't always necessarily mean you get to say whatever you want.  Student journalists will learn that sometimes you have to monitor what you say, and how you say it so no one is offended, even if the facts in the story are true. There is a right way, and a wrong way to say something, and that is what the students at working at the Westview High School paper in Portland, Oregon got a wake up call in, and perhaps maybe for the better.

OPINION

TARP's effect on pluralistic, elite models of power in America

In our last edition, we noted that the President Obama's administration, tasked with bringing change to America is comprised of the political and financial elites of the last 30 years. We further discussed the fact that because those elites have been in positions of power for the last period, our current situation in a result of their policy. This realization raised the question, "Why are the same people always in power?" We attempted to answer this question by suggesting the populace's acquiescence of self-determination through the dialectic of non-thinking and fear. Today, we explore the question of incumbency further through an analysis of where the power to create policy is vested within our society.

OPINION

Stop settling, start succeeding

Admit it: There's at least one area of your life where things just aren't going your way. It could be in your academic pursuits, your intimate or social relationships or even personal finance. Maybe you're a chronic procrastinator, a disorganized slob or a disenchanted significant other.

OPINION

A deeper look at the stimulus plan

I originally began this letter with a desire to take Alexander Draine to task for the economic policies he has advocated in the past few weeks. I had hoped to end with a small quip about his positions being a "draine" on our society. As I pondered and searched for evidence to support my claims, I realized something. Neither one of us has the omniscience necessary to argue our points with the absolute certainty that he has cloaked his arguments in.

OPINION

Kudos Roddick

We live in a world today where athletes are supposed to be role models — whether they like it or not. We see their actions on and off the playing field and judge them by thinking, "What kind of message does that send to the kids?" Lately, it has been hard to find a sport that has not been tainted in some way.

OPINION

Fiscal goals a good idea

There is nothing wrong with a little push. Rutgers issued their most recent press release entitled, "Rutgers University's $500 Million Economic Stimulus," to the chagrin of hardly anyone. It ran as a headline in yesterday's Daily Targum, but talk has been quiet about its lofty fiscal goals. There has been no outrage for a reason — it is a good idea.

OPINION

Social networking bad for your health

Social networking has become one of the most popular and acceptable ways of keeping in touch with friends, family and classmates. The creation of sites like MySpace and Facebook has allowed people to catch up and converse with each other with the click of a mouse. But could this form of communicating be detrimental in more ways than just cheating yourself of spending quality time in person with a friend? Recent studies have shown that health problems can be caused by the lack of face-to-face contact. Psychologist Dr. Aric Sigman claims that "e-mailing someone instead of actually seeing them may have wide ranging biological effects." The increased isolation could alter the way certain genes work and upset immune responses, hormone levels and the function of arteries. There are certain hormones that are activated when interacting with someone in person that you don't get when e-mailing someone. One particular hormone known as the "cuddle chemical," oxytocin, which promotes bonding, is activated when with someone but not when using technological communication. Some genes, including ones that deal with the immune system and responses to stress, also act differently. There is also the risk that constant use of these sites instead of actual in person socialization can impair mental performance.

OPINION

Is the stimulus worth it

The past week has been one of the fiscally craziest ever. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped to its lowest point since many of us were in middle school, the U.S. government took steps towards buying up 40 percent of Citigroup's stock, Starbucks started selling instant coffee for cheap prices and President Barack Obama signed into law a stimulus package that would pump $787 billion of taxpayer money into the economy.    

OPINION

U.S. airstrikes in Pakistan necessary

In the letter "Change: Not in Obama's foreign policy" that appeared in the Feb. 6 edition of The Daily Targum, the author makes two points that I cannot help but disagree with. He criticizes the Obama and Bush administrations for ordering airstrikes on Taliban and Al Qaeda in Pakistan and he criticizes both administrations for their support of Israel's military operations in Gaza.


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