opinion

OPINION

RUSA constitution is fair and balanced

There have been several articles and many ongoing discussions related to student government over the last few weeks. Specifically, some questions have come up related to the selection of the Allocations Board, both under the current system and the proposed constitution for RUSA. Under the current structure, the Rutgers University Student Assembly Allocations Board is a non-elected committee affiliated with RUSA; the committee functions as an advisory board to RUSA and is responsible for the allocation of the Student Activity Fee - Regular. These funds are allocated to student organizations registered with the Office of Student Involvement as well as various registered events on an as needed basis. The goal of the Allocations Board is to promote and support diversity of programming made available to Rutgers University students through the fair and efficient use of the student activity fees.

OPINION

Ads are watching you as you watch them

Americans are exposed to hundreds of ads everyday. Whether it's a catchy radio jingle, a bright colored billboard or one of those annoying TV commercials for the "Shamwow!" or "Snuggie," it seems almost impossible to escape advertisers' attempts to grab your attention. As technology is becoming more and more advanced, these marketing moguls are finding new ways to target society with ads specifically geared toward certain demographics. Web sites are now taking personal information from profiles and gearing ads at you through what other sites you visit. It's now impossible to go on Facebook without having an ad about your favorite band, sports team or even ads dealing with your relationship status appearing on the side of your screen. The technique of gearing certain ads toward an individual person is now coming out of the Internet world and into the real world.

OPINION

RUSA constitution: Troubled waters ahead

Only two years ago, student leaders from around campus were urging every student to vote on the proposed Rutgers University Student Assembly constitution. With a new structure and model in place for Rutgers, students were told it was vital to vote on a new document that would reflect the new structure of the University. Now it seems two years later — not literally — the same people who were imploring that the students vote for the new constitution are insisting this new constitution will fix all of the problems and that the document everybody voted for two years ago is a mess. It is clear that better communication between RUSA and the students they serve is necessary.

OPINION

NBC bans sexy veggie Super Bowl ad

Many of us spent yesterday with our eyes glued to the TV watching Super Bowl XLIII. Families across America rooted for their favorite teams and feasted on pizza, hot wings and the various other snack foods that you associate with game day. Another big part of the experience that people get excited for are those famous Super Bowl commercials. Millions watch these commercials, and the best are usually talked about for a while after the big day. Advertisers hope that they will score at least a 30 second spot for the price of $3 million, hoping that it is their product's advertisement that will cause a buzz because their ad was funny or inspiring and leaves the company name being said over and over.

OPINION

Lincoln's test of time

There has been a very recent revival in interest in Abraham Lincoln's presidency, just in time for his 200th birthday. The new president from Illinois has commonly invoked the legacy of his predecessor. During the speculation of President Barack Obama's Cabinet appointees, there was talk about how Lincoln successfully assembled his "Team of Rivals," as specifically described in Doris Kearns Goodwin's book. Clearly, Lincoln is one of our country's revered leaders.

OPINION

Clearing up facts in the Gaza conflict

In Thursday's article, "Gaza conflict halts Israel study," there are some factual inaccuracies in need of correction. The article states that the reason for the suspension of Rutgers' Study Abroad program in Israel is "the escalation in violence between Palestine and Israel." The most recent escalation in violence has been between the country of Israel and Hamas, the ruling political party in the Gaza Strip and a U.S. State Department and European Union-recognized terrorist organization. It is more accurate to refer to the Gaza Strip as part of the Palestinian territories, as Palestine is not an internationally recognized country. The article further cites the "recent increase of rocket attacks into Israeli settlements." The rocket attacks, launched by Hamas inside the Gaza Strip, have fallen on sovereign Israel and not "Israeli settlements." Israeli towns such as Sderot, Ashkelon, Ashdod, Be'er Sheva, Gedera and others targeted are located in Israel within the internationally recognized 1967 borders. When reporting on such a complex conflict such as the Arab-Israeli conflict, it is imperative to check facts and terminology.

OPINION

Laurels and darts

Being a college student doesn't leave you with much money to spare. With expenses like tuition, books and other fees it's hard to come up with much pocket change, especially for things like recreational activities. The Rutgers Recreation Department has solved that problem with the creation of their new Dollar Menu. The menu offers 48 different one-time programs ranging from fitness to music all for the low price of $1. The reason for the low price of these programs is because many of the instructors are deans and professors volunteering their time to teach students the various topics and activities offered. It's a great opportunity to bring together students, professors and deans in sharing their interests and hobbies with each other. The idea of becoming a sort of RU "dollar menu-naire" is very appealing to students, as the programs all filled up very quickly. The success of the Dollar Menu shows promise that these programs will continue to be offered in the future, allowing students to explore new subjects and find people who share common interests with them. Laurels to the Rutgers University Department of Recreation and their great idea to offer students fun recreational activities at a price anybody can afford.

OPINION

Praise song of myself

If getting on the pedestal in front of the minutes-old president is all it takes, then Elizabeth Alexander joined an exclusive group last week.

OPINION

Violence in virtual reality affecting real life

One of the most popular hobbies that kids have today is playing videogames.  Their entire day revolves around when they can get their hands on that controller again.  The bell rings at school and many rush home to their sanctuary of a couch, or one of those specially made for playing videogames chairs, where they will plug in their Wii, Xbox, Playstation  or whatever system they deem is worthy of their playing (most kids have all of them anyway).  They lose themselves into a world of fantasy, where they have all the power to decide who lives, who dies, what to rescue and more.  They work hard, saving their progress as they go along, to hopefully pass through all those dangerous levels to become the victor. 

OPINION

The third way

I have a simple idea regarding student funding for the school newspaper. Make the current fee a recommended value and allow students to easily indicate that they wish to pay more or less than this amount. This way, students who feel strongly about the newspaper can pay more than the current $9.75 fee and students who might otherwise opt out may elect to pay a few dollars rather than give nothing. Surely this would generate more revenue than an opt out system and would be just as fair.

OPINION

Plans to protect planet fall short

There was an article in the Jan. 6, 2009 issue of the New York Times titled "Bush to Protect Vast New Pacific Tracts." Finally, Bush has decided to do something good for the planet, humans and nonhumans. He designated "vast tracts of American-controlled Pacific Ocean islands, reefs, surface waters and sea floor as marine national monuments…limiting fishing, mining, oil exploration or other commercial activities." Sounds great; what a wonderful way to start off my morning at work, knowing that action (although it is minor) has been taken to protect what is left of this planet.

OPINION

Company makes money off of murder victim

The tragedy of Caylee Anthony, the 2 year old whose mother has been charged with her murder, has been taking over news channels since she disappeared in June. The story has also been making headlines, as her skeletal remains were recently found a half a mile from her grandparent's home. Her grandparents had also become familiar faces on television, as they were active in doing anything to find their granddaughter and have clearly been the most affected by the little girl's disappearance and murder. This story is an incredibly sad and disturbing tragedy that has touched the hearts of many people who have seen and been keeping track of the news coverage about Anthony.

OPINION

What are you rushing into

With a new semester comes a new recruitment season for Rutgers fraternities and sororities. For the first-year students who have had a semester to settle into college life and adjust to new schedules, now is the time to check out greek life and make an informed decision. For most people, greek life on campus is a big mystery. You might attend some parties, have a few friends who are brothers or who are thinking about pledging, but if you are like most people you never considered the reasons for checking out fraternities and sororities at Rutgers.

OPINION

Kevin Nedza to RUSA: Hate to say 'I told you so'

This letter is in response to "College Avenue Council president's letter of resignation" by Yelena Shvarts in the Jan. 26 issue of The Daily Targum. In the piece, Shvarts, the former College Avenue Council president, outlined why she could no longer hold her position on the council. She cites the bureaucracy and ineffectiveness of student government at Rutgers. While I will be the first to admit student government traditionally has not done what it supposed to do, and has for a long time been the voice of the administration rather than the voice of the student body, there are some things that just must be clarified in response to this letter. Accusations cannot be made without first taking into consideration who is making them and for what purpose.

OPINION

The LSAT: More than you cared to know

Prospective LSAT takers be aware: The following commentary is based on actual LSAT experience taken firsthand and confirmed by actual LSAT practice tests and very real and humiliating scored results. Be forewarned: If you or a friend you care about plan on taking the test any time in the near future please read this carefully before committing. And even then, consult a psychologist first.


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