Dan Corey

Dan Corey

Editor-in-Chief

Dan Corey is a Rutgers Business School junior majoring in marketing and journalism and media studies. Originally from Middletown, New Jersey, his hobbies include sleeping, eating and complaining about a lack of the two. He enjoys coffee, lemon cake, road rage, playing the drums, being loud and his pet beagle, Petey. You can listen to his radio show, "The 'D' Train" on Wednesday mornings on WRSU-FM Rutgers Radio. You can follow him on Twitter @danielhcorey for more stories, or email him at eic@dailytargum.com.


Recent Articles:

The 18th annual Rutgers University Dance Marathon began on April 1 and has seen many changes from previous years. Organizers said these changes have generated positive feedback, and may help increase the amount raised from years past.
NEWS

Rutgers Dance Marathon enters 18th year

More than 45 years since the Rutgers Zeta Beta Tau fraternity sponsored one of the first dance marathons nationwide, Rutgers University Dance Marathon still has University students moving to the same beat.

Joachim Messing, director of the Rutgers Waksman Institute of Microbiology, helped revolutionize research with his work on genetically modified organisms.
NEWS

Rutgers professor reflects on contributions to medicine, agriculture

More than 40 years after cracking the genetic code, Rutgers microbiologist Joachim Messing does not regret his decision to help save lives and not cash in. Messing, director of the Rutgers Waksman Institute of Microbiology, has entered his 31st year at the University after setting the foundation for creating synthetic human proteins, such as insulin, along with reducing world hunger with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). A German immigrant, Messing arrived at Rutgers in 1985 when former University President Edward J.

Courtesy of Kevin Allred | January 2016 | Kevin Allred, an adjunct professor in the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, was given a psychiatric evaluation after tweeting about gun usage. 
NEWS

​Rutgers ‘Politicizing Beyoncé’ course moves to Department of American Studies

Only six years into its existence, the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies decided they were not “crazy in love” with the idea of offering students the “Politicizing Beyoncé” course in the near future. After not being included on the department’s course schedule for two semesters, the highly popular black feminism class that addresses topics like power dynamics and sexuality will be offered in Fall 2016 by the Department of American Studies. “Politicizing Beyoncé” was created in 2010 as a special topics class for the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies, said Kevin Allred, a professor in the Department of American Studies and the course's creator. “They’ve given me no reason for why it’s wasn’t renewed for the spring or summer, so after hearing back that the schedule was finalized and ... that it wasn’t being offered, I went to the American Studies department,” he said. Allred pitched “Politicizing Beyoncé” to the Department of American Studies because he is an adjunct professor, and he will not get paid for teaching any courses for two semesters in a row if no department offers the course to students, he said. It is not unusual for courses to be offered in one department and then be offered in another, said University spokesman Greg Trevor on behalf of the Department of Women’s and Gender Studies. “This course has not disappeared from the spring schedule,” Trevor said in an email.

NEWS

‘Rutgers since 1945’ book chronicles pivotal events in recent University history

Even though many Rutgers students and alumni take pride in the University’s rich 249-year history as the 13th-oldest college in the United States, most are probably unaware that the University experienced the most change within the past 70 years. Just in time for the kickoff of a one-year celebration for the University’s 250th anniversary, a Rutgers professor chronicled significant historical developments throughout the last 70 years of the University’s existence in a new book, “Rutgers since 1945: A History of the State University of New Jersey.”

NEWS

7 tenants set in place to occupy new College Avenue development in August

Seven businesses have signed leases to become tenants at The Yard @ College Avenue, one of the $300 million College Avenue Redevelopment Initiative projects, which is currently under construction at the corner of College Avenue and Hamilton Street across from Scott Hall, according to a press release from Pierson Commercial Real Estate. The former site of Lot 8, which used to house a wide variety of the University’s famous grease trucks, will welcome seven new tenants when the College Avenue complex opens in August 2016: Starbucks Coffee, honeygrow, Bella’s Burger Shack, RU Hungry, House of Cupcakes, Jersey Mike’s Subs and Krispy Pizza. “We are extremely excited with obtaining these best-in-class tenants for our high-profile project,” said Jason Pierson, president of Pierson Commercial, in the press release.

NEWS

Rutgers ‘Muggle Mayhem’ club bridges community service, literature

With 18 distinct schools and colleges, New Jersey’s flagship state university seems to boast a longer list of options for students than Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, which features the four Hogwarts Houses. But just because Rutgers does not provide an outlet for aspiring witches and wizards does not mean it is missing a destination for fans of the Harry Potter series.

INSIDE BEAT

Annual jazz festival celebrates emerging, veteran musicians in Hub City

While most New Brunswick dwellers recognize Hub City’s jazz scene as established and flourishing, many might not realize how attractive the city is for rising and veteran jazz musicians alike. Both upcoming and established jazz acts — specifically the Alexis Morrast Quartet, Expansions: The Dave Liebman Group and the Sean Jones Quartet — performed their own take on America’s original music genre Saturday afternoon at Livingston Avenue in Downtown New Brunswick. The eighth installment of New Brunswick’s “Hub City Sounds” festival series, the second day of the third annual Central Jersey Jazz Festival showcased performances from aspiring artists to experienced veterans who played with legends like Miles Davis. The New Brunswick jazz scene and related musical acts have the most culturally diverse audience base of any performances in Hub City, said Virginia DeBerry, co-founder of the New Brunswick Jazz Project. “It needs to be something that people have access to,” DeBerry said.

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Recent Media:

According to a December 2015 Rutgers-Eagleton poll announced on Tuesday, whether a person calls the meat "Taylor Ham" or "pork roll" depends on where they live in New Jersey. 
NEWS

According to a December 2015 Rutgers-Eagleton poll announced on Tuesday, whether a person calls the meat "Taylor Ham" or "pork roll" depends on where they live in New Jersey. 

Marilyn Ali, a School of Arts and Sciences senior, resident assistant, former doo-wop singer, former EE bus driver and current Uber driver, is 65 years old with no plans of slowing down anytime soon.
NEWS

Marilyn Ali, a School of Arts and Sciences senior, resident assistant, former doo-wop singer, former EE bus driver and current Uber driver, is 65 years old with no plans of slowing down anytime soon.

Ali is set to receive her bachelor's degree this May as a communication major and theater arts minor, and plans to attend graduate school for social work after graduation.
NEWS

Ali is set to receive her bachelor's degree this May as a communication major and theater arts minor, and plans to attend graduate school for social work after graduation.

Alexander Babatunde, a School of Arts and Sciences senior, Dean Flamio, a Rutgers Business School senior and Jerrell Chalmers, a School of Arts and Sciences senior co-founded Qilo, a branding company centered around the pineapple as a universal symbol of hospitality. 
NEWS

Alexander Babatunde, a School of Arts and Sciences senior, Dean Flamio, a Rutgers Business School senior and Jerrell Chalmers, a School of Arts and Sciences senior co-founded Qilo, a branding company centered around the pineapple as a universal symbol of hospitality. 

Precious Williams, a Rutgers School of Law–Newark Class of 2007 alumna and CEO of Curvy Girlz Lingerie, pitched her lingerie company to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member in pursuit of tapping into a market of 40 million American women wearing clothes of size 14 or higher after asking 237 Harlem women for advice.
NEWS

Precious Williams, a Rutgers School of Law–Newark Class of 2007 alumna and CEO of Curvy Girlz Lingerie, pitched her lingerie company to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member in pursuit of tapping into a market of 40 million American women wearing clothes of size 14 or higher after asking 237 Harlem women for advice.

Rifat Parvez, husband of a Cook College Class of 1996 alumna, pitched an idea inspired by his wife after she suggested he find a way to dissolve calcium in water, allowing individuals, particularly athletes, to consume 80 percent of their daily calcium requirement with one bottle of water.
NEWS

Rifat Parvez, husband of a Cook College Class of 1996 alumna, pitched an idea inspired by his wife after she suggested he find a way to dissolve calcium in water, allowing individuals, particularly athletes, to consume 80 percent of their daily calcium requirement with one bottle of water.

Kareen Elsheryie, a School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Class of 2014 alumnus, and Akshay Nigam, a New York University Class of 2014 alumnus, pitched their mobile app "Pikkup," a sports social network allowing athletes to find sports games to play in their area.
NEWS

Kareen Elsheryie, a School of Environmental and Biological Sciences Class of 2014 alumnus, and Akshay Nigam, a New York University Class of 2014 alumnus, pitched their mobile app "Pikkup," a sports social network allowing athletes to find sports games to play in their area.

Rutgers-affiliated entrepreneurs pitch their invention plans to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member.
NEWS

Rutgers-affiliated entrepreneurs pitch their invention plans to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member.

A Rutgers-affiliated entrepreneur pitches her invention plans to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member.
NEWS

A Rutgers-affiliated entrepreneur pitches her invention plans to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member.

David Bulka, a pastor and Essex County resident, pitched his invention, "Clamp Champion," which was created after discovering cut-up PVC vacuum tubing had the ability to clamp smartphones in place in cars, so drivers could answer important phone calls on-the-go.
NEWS

David Bulka, a pastor and Essex County resident, pitched his invention, "Clamp Champion," which was created after discovering cut-up PVC vacuum tubing had the ability to clamp smartphones in place in cars, so drivers could answer important phone calls on-the-go.

Jarel Hawkins, CEO of EcoSOLElution, a School of Engineering Class of 2007 alumnus and self-proclaimed "sneakerhead," wants to impress Lori Greiner from "Shark Tank" in order to have his organic shoe-cleaning company appear on the QVC network.
NEWS

Jarel Hawkins, CEO of EcoSOLElution, a School of Engineering Class of 2007 alumnus and self-proclaimed "sneakerhead," wants to impress Lori Greiner from "Shark Tank" in order to have his organic shoe-cleaning company appear on the QVC network.

Kim Osterhoudt, a Rutgers Business School Class of 1978 alumna, pitched her line of fruit jams, “Jams by Kim,” at a casting call for Season 7 of CNBC’s “Shark Tank” Friday afternoon at Rutgers Business School on the Newark campus.
NEWS

Kim Osterhoudt, a Rutgers Business School Class of 1978 alumna, pitched her line of fruit jams, “Jams by Kim,” at a casting call for Season 7 of CNBC’s “Shark Tank” Friday afternoon at Rutgers Business School on the Newark campus.

Justin Harris, creator of "Justin's Hot Stuff" hot sauce and a first-year student at Piscataway High School, pitches his special sauce to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member with his mother after they both discovered a secret recipe while experimenting in the kitchen together.
NEWS

Justin Harris, creator of "Justin's Hot Stuff" hot sauce and a first-year student at Piscataway High School, pitches his special sauce to a "Shark Tank" casting crew member with his mother after they both discovered a secret recipe while experimenting in the kitchen together.

Jeffrey Torres, a Rutgers Business School senior, and Kelvin Betances, a New York University senior, pitched their idea about starting a user-friendly online platform that helps college student groups better promote events and organizational initiatives.
NEWS

Jeffrey Torres, a Rutgers Business School senior, and Kelvin Betances, a New York University senior, pitched their idea about starting a user-friendly online platform that helps college student groups better promote events and organizational initiatives.

Kim Osterhoudt, a Rutgers Business School Class of 1978 alumna, pitched her line of fruit jams, “Jams by Kim,” at a casting call for Season 7 of CNBC’s “Shark Tank” Friday afternoon at the Rutgers Business School on the Newark campus.
NEWS

Kim Osterhoudt, a Rutgers Business School Class of 1978 alumna, pitched her line of fruit jams, “Jams by Kim,” at a casting call for Season 7 of CNBC’s “Shark Tank” Friday afternoon at the Rutgers Business School on the Newark campus.

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