Meghan Grau


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According to a survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, employers plan to hire 9.6 percent more new graduates from the Class of 2015 for US operations than they did for the Class of 2014.PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY EDWIN GANO / ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR
NEWS

Job opportunities appear bright for students graduating in 2015

Class of 2015 graduates can sigh in relief, not because it is almost time for graduation, but their employment prospects are better than those faced by recent graduates, according to a survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). NACE’s spring update to their job outlook survey found that employers plan to hire 9.6 percent more new graduates from the Class of 2015 for U.S. operations than they did for the Class of 2014, according to the organization’s website.

International Women’s Week, which will begin on March 9, aims to celebrate the role of women and encourage dialogue about women’s issues. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY NAAZ MODAN / PHOTO EDITOR
NEWS

International Women’s Week seeks to empower, connect students about women’s issues

A carnival-themed social will kick off International Women’s Week at the University on Monday March 9, aiming to empower women and connect campus organizations about women’s issues. International Women’s Day, observed each year on March 8, will be honored throughout the upcoming week with a series of events hosted by the Rutgers chapter of ONE, a non-profit nonpartisan advocacy organization, said Shaila Huq, president of ONE at Rutgers.

Courtesy of Lei Lei | Lei Lei, instated as the dean of the Rutgers Business School last semester, was recently named one of New Jersey’s most powerful business women.
NEWS

Business dean receives best 50 women award

One of the best businesswomen in New Jersey can be found at Rutgers, according to a list of New Jersey’s Best 50 Women in Business for 2015 culled by NJBIZ. Lei Lei, dean of the Rutgers Business School and title recipient, will be recognized alongside fellow honorees, including leaders from other New Jersey schools.

Providing children with higher quality childhood education reduces the chances of students being placed in special education classes as they grow older, according to a study recently published by the Duke University Press | PHOTO ILLUSTRATION
NEWS

High-quality early childhood education may reduce special education enrollment and costs

High-quality early childhood programs enable a reduction in the number of children being placed in special education, according to a study recently published by researchers at Duke University. Two early childhood initiatives, North Carolina Prekindergarten and Smart Start, produced the combined effect of a 39 percent decrease in the likelihood that children would be placed in special education programs by the time they reached the third grade, according to the study.

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