Noa Halff

Noa Halff

Noa is a School of Arts and Sciences junior who likes coffee and is half-blind. She enjoys friends, travel and photography. After work she goes home and thinks about the impending heat death of the universe. In her free time, she plays soccer with her community-based sorority that serves the city of Gotham. You can follow her on Twitter @NoaHalff and email her at university@dailytargum.com.


Recent Articles:

Courtesy of Shaakira Razzaq | School of Nursing doctoral candidate Shaakira Abdul Razzaq is teaching two workshops on abstinence-based sex education.
NEWS

Rutgers student launches abstinence sex education program for Muslim women

During her first year at the Rutgers School of Nursing, Shaakira Abdul Razzaq gave birth to her son and began to raise him as a single mother. Now 26-years-old and scheduled to graduate from Rutgers in May 2017, Razzaq is using her personal experience to provide sex education for young Muslim women, she said in an email. “Sex Education in the Mosque” is a research project created by the Rutgers Doctorate of Nursing Practice Team.

A new Rutgers study found that members of Generation X - those born between 1965 and 1974 - are more than twice as likely to have a stroke than the average population. People born in 1961 or before, meanwhile, are seeing declining stroke rates.
NEWS

Rutgers study finds Generation X at increased risk for strokes

Younger does not always mean healthier, at least when it comes to the increasing rates of strokes among adults. A Rutgers study shows the rate of strokes more than doubled among Generation X — people born between 1965 and 1974 — and declined for individuals over age 55.

Students watched CNN and Fox News as election results came in on Tuesday night in the College Avenue Student Center.
NEWS

Rutgers students react to surprise Trump victory

Students held their heads down as they walked along the streets of the College Avenue campus on the gloomy morning after election day, said Taylin Liebowitz, a School of Arts and Science sophomore. After Tuesday night, Donald Trump is set to be the 45th President of the United States. “Shocked” and “devastated” are just some of the words Rutgers students used to describe their reaction. “I am numb.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION | Students at universities nationwide have posted various racially insensitive pictures on Snapchat, resulting in many of their expulsions.
NEWS

Rutgers administrators react to racially sensitive Snapchat photos shared online

Students from different schools and backgrounds have differing ideas of what can be appropriate to post on social media outlets such as Snapchat. In the past month, the social network was used by university students to share racist photos and captions at five different universities across the nation.  Creating a dialogue to explain to students why certain photos or social media posts are offensive will help them learn more about people who do not look like them, said Allison Harbin, a Graduate School--New Brunswick student “Who RU," a new initiative documenting diversity at Rutgers, is aiming to do just that. The Center for Race and Ethnicity, a scholarly center at the University and one of the components of the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, invites students to start this dialogue and discuss students experience of race and ethnicity on campus, Harbin said. “We want to create a platform for a respectful exchange and minority voices,” she said. At the University of North Dakota, a photo was posted of three white students smiling with the caption “locked the black b**** out,” referring to a roommate locked out of their residence hall. Another photo shows four female students wearing black masks with the caption “black lives matter.” A similar photo was shared by a Quinnipiac University student. It shows a smiling female student wearing blackface with the caption “black lives matter.” A Kansas State University student posted a photo with blackface, referring to herself as the n-word waving a gang sign.  At Prairie View A&M University, a Mexican student posted a photo of her face covered with black tape with the caption, “When you’re tryna fit in at your HBCU." This can happen anywhere, said Mia Kissil, Senior Program Director at Center for Race and ethnicity at Rutgers. “And I think it does happen anywhere,” she said.

Facebook has launched various tools dedicated toward encouraging voter registration, especially among young people who are less likely to vote, by sending reminders to users and placing a "register now" button at the top of their news feeds.
NEWS

New Facebook feature may encourage voter registration among millennials

Facebook wants to increase voter turnout this November.  The social networking platform has launched various tools dedicated toward encouraging voter registration, especially among young people who are less likely to vote, by sending reminders to users and placing a "register now" button at the top of their news feeds.

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Recent Media:

Students reported seeing brown or discolored water in toilets and sinks at Rutgers, which may be caused by hydrant flushing in New Brunswick.
NEWS

Students reported seeing brown or discolored water in toilets and sinks at Rutgers, which may be caused by hydrant flushing in New Brunswick.

The Orthodox Christian Campus Ministries held “Jesus Awareness Day” to introduce students to the life and death Jesus Christ. Different activities were held as part of the festivities.
NEWS

The Orthodox Christian Campus Ministries held “Jesus Awareness Day” to introduce students to the life and death Jesus Christ. Different activities were held as part of the festivities.

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