HORU October 21, 2016

<p>“A lot of people think hacking has to do with computer security, or trying to steal people’s information. But it’s really about trying to find ways to solve problems. And it’s about trying to do it in a way that you think is best. It’s your solution to a problem as a opposed to a way of causing problems. This is something anyone can do. You don’t have to be a genius with this innate ability to use a computer to make something that you’re passionate about. And between helping to organize HackRU and HackHERS, just seeing people grow and get excited is what I really love. When they finally figure out what was wrong with their code, and they fix it with the help of someone else and their eyes just glow, that’s why hackathons mean a lot to me. It’s a grounds to really impact someone. Personally, I would not be a computer science major if it weren’t for hackathons. A student who didn’t know what they wanted to do all of a sudden switches to computer science because of hackathons and because they were so proud of what they built. At the end of the day, I think it’s really magical.”</p>

“A lot of people think hacking has to do with computer security, or trying to steal people’s information. But it’s really about trying to find ways to solve problems. And it’s about trying to do it in a way that you think is best. It’s your solution to a problem as a opposed to a way of causing problems. This is something anyone can do. You don’t have to be a genius with this innate ability to use a computer to make something that you’re passionate about. And between helping to organize HackRU and HackHERS, just seeing people grow and get excited is what I really love. When they finally figure out what was wrong with their code, and they fix it with the help of someone else and their eyes just glow, that’s why hackathons mean a lot to me. It’s a grounds to really impact someone. Personally, I would not be a computer science major if it weren’t for hackathons. A student who didn’t know what they wanted to do all of a sudden switches to computer science because of hackathons and because they were so proud of what they built. At the end of the day, I think it’s really magical.”


“A lot of people think hacking has to do with computer security, or trying to steal people’s information. But it’s really about trying to find ways to solve problems. And it’s about trying to do it in a way that you think is best. It’s your solution to a problem as a opposed to a way of causing problems. This is something anyone can do. You don’t have to be a genius with this innate ability to use a computer to make something that you’re passionate about. And between helping to organize HackRU and HackHERS, just seeing people grow and get excited is what I really love. When they finally figure out what was wrong with their code, and they fix it with the help of someone else and their eyes just glow, that’s why hackathons mean a lot to me. It’s a grounds to really impact someone. Personally, I would not be a computer science major if it weren’t for hackathons. A student who didn’t know what they wanted to do all of a sudden switches to computer science because of hackathons and because they were so proud of what they built. At the end of the day, I think it’s really magical.”


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