HORU October 8, 2016

<p>(1/3) “I’m very aware of my position in society as a white woman from the upper-middle class with no religious affiliation. And as a historian, a future teacher and as an American citizen, I feel like I need to be. Because of my outward appearance, I’ve been given things without asking for them or without having to work for them. But this is a problem because I’m receiving them and not everyone else is. I grew up in South Jersey in a town that had an awesome public school system. It was very diverse and as I take more classes at Rutgers, I’m starting to realize that my educational experience growing up was really very unique. I can remember discussing things like respect and trustworthiness and acceptance. And even from a young age, we were always encouraged to have these really difficult discussions and to share our experiences about how these issues affected us based on our backgrounds.”</p>

(1/3) “I’m very aware of my position in society as a white woman from the upper-middle class with no religious affiliation. And as a historian, a future teacher and as an American citizen, I feel like I need to be. Because of my outward appearance, I’ve been given things without asking for them or without having to work for them. But this is a problem because I’m receiving them and not everyone else is. I grew up in South Jersey in a town that had an awesome public school system. It was very diverse and as I take more classes at Rutgers, I’m starting to realize that my educational experience growing up was really very unique. I can remember discussing things like respect and trustworthiness and acceptance. And even from a young age, we were always encouraged to have these really difficult discussions and to share our experiences about how these issues affected us based on our backgrounds.”


(1/3) “I’m very aware of my position in society as a white woman from the upper-middle class with no religious affiliation. And as a historian, a future teacher and as an American citizen, I feel like I need to be. Because of my outward appearance, I’ve been given things without asking for them or without having to work for them. But this is a problem because I’m receiving them and not everyone else is. I grew up in South Jersey in a town that had an awesome public school system. It was very diverse and as I take more classes at Rutgers, I’m starting to realize that my educational experience growing up was really very unique. I can remember discussing things like respect and trustworthiness and acceptance. And even from a young age, we were always encouraged to have these really difficult discussions and to share our experiences about how these issues affected us based on our backgrounds.”


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