Rutgers professor to join National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medicines committee

Shawna V. Hudson, the research division chief in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, researches healthcare for vulnerable populations.
Photo by Rutgers.eduShawna V. Hudson, the research division chief in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, researches healthcare for vulnerable populations.

Shawna V. Hudson, professor and research division chief in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (RWJMS), has been selected to serve as a member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicines Committee on Implementing High Quality Primary Care. 

Hudson said she learned about her selection in early January from a period of public comment, where the roster of proposed members were posted on the National Academies website.

Hudson said her multiple roles were relevant to the committee’s task of examining how to implement high-quality primary care. She is a researcher focusing on vulnerable populations and is a research member of the Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science, the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Institute for Health, Healthcare Policy and Aging Research. She also is the director of the Center Advancing Research and Evaluation for Patient-Centered Care at RWJMS and the Community Engagement Core of the New Jersey Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science. 

“Committees for the National Academies are pulled together to represent a range of expertise for the task at hand,” Hudson said. “They also seek to balance perspectives and are charged to include representation of members of the National Academies, (of) those who have been involved in previous studies and also to include women, minorities and young professionals.”

She said the purpose of this committee was to examine the current state of primary care in the United States, develop an implementation plan to strengthen primary care services in the country, especially for underserved populations, and to inform primary care systems around the world. 

As a part of the committee, Hudson said she would make a consensus report through a study of 18 months. She said she would not be able to comment on outcomes because the report would be based on the totality of the evidence and consensus of the committee. 

Alfred F. Tallia, professor and chair of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at RWJMS, said Hudson’s contributions will help improve healthcare. 

“I am elated. I know most of the individuals on the (National Academies) committee, and I know Dr. Hudson will positively influence their deliberations with real data,  and as a result their findings and recommendations will strongly influence in a positive way the future of healthcare for millions of Americans,” Tallia said.

Tallia said Hudson’s selection is recognition of the fact that the department has been a national resource in this area, and Hudson has already worked with other leaders in family medicine. 

“My hope is that Dr. Hudson and her committee members make strong recommendations for how the U.S. can promote the healing and salutary benefits of primary care for all groups and populations in our country,” Tallia said.