Max Marcus


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Professors and faculty members at Rutgers are preparing to enter contract renegotiations, with backing from the the American Association of University Professors (AAUP)
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With thousands of Rutgers faculty contracts up for renegotiation, the AAUP weighs in

A majority of Rutgers faculty contracts will be renegotiated in 2018. For the Rutgers chapter of the American Association of University Professors and American Federation of Teachers (AAUP-AFT), this represents an opportunity to remedy some of the administration's policy-based issues.  David Hughes, a professor in the Department of Anthropology and the vice president of Rutgers AAUP-AFT, said that in recent years, the administration has preferred to hire part-time lecturers and other contingent faculty rather than tenure track professors — which can be detrimental to students.

Design flaws with the Samsung Galaxy Note 7s battery caused certain phones to spontaneously catch fire, costing the company over $5 billion in recalls and a 30 percent drop in profits that quarter.
NEWS

Rutgers graduate works to develop a safer phone battery

The technology and the safety of cell phone batteries came the world's attention last year when a design flaw in the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 caused the phone to randomly catch fire. Rutgers alumna Preeya Kuray, now a Ph.D. candidate at Penn State, has been working on a type of battery that could be a safer alternative to the current industry standard.

Despite being marketed as such, the Rutgers 20/20s blind date auction leads to very few dates. Instead, the event helps fundraise for the Sankara Eye Foundation, which provides free eye surgery for people in India suffering from curable blindness.
NEWS

Rutgers Blind Date Auction fundraises for eye surgery in India

RU 20/20 hosted its annual Blind Date Auction a semester early this year. The auction is a fundraiser for the Sankara Eye Foundation, which provides free eye surgery for people in India suffering from curable blindness. Despite the event being a date auction, it leads to very few dates. Phani Paladugu, a School of Engineering senior, bought his fraternity brother Divas Singh for $100.

After failing out of school to take care of her daughter, Anjanette Vaidyain reenrolled in 2015 to start Rutgers Students with Kids. The group focuses on debunking social stigmas about young mothers on campus by increasing visibility on how parents can access higher education.
NEWS

Rutgers senior leads advocacy and support group for students with children

According to research presented last fall at the Undergraduate Research Symposium by Anjanette Vaidya, the president and founder of Rutgers Students with Children, the Rutgers community and university institutionally discriminate against young single mothers pursuing college degrees The School of Arts and Sciences senior won the top award at the symposium and later presented her findings at an academic conference at the University of North Carolina.  In an email, she briefly summarized her findings with statistics showing that 96 percent of young single mothers pursuing a college degree fail out of school.  “When Rutgers says, 'We support women,' when Douglass says, 'We have been supporting women for 100 years,' you have to ask, 'Which women?'” Vaidya said.

In addition to ancient handmade books, the collection in the basement of Alexander Library includes literature from the personal collections of Walt Whitman and Mark Twain.
NEWS

Alexander Library is home to an eclectic assortment of rare books and artifacts

Housed primarily in the basement of Alexander Library, the Rutgers Library Special Collections holds a vast assortment of books and other materials that reflect print culture from its beginnings in Europe all the way to present-day New Jersey. The library's Rare Books Librarian, Michael Joseph, normally collects books of practically universal interest: the Rare Books collection includes contemporary editions of Shakespeare's works, books from the personal collections of Walt Whitman and Mark Twain, and early English-language bibles. Currently Joseph is preparing for the New Jersey Book Arts Symposium, which is to be held at Alexander Library on Friday.

The first meeting of the New Jersey Student Power Network brought students together from across the state to find creative solutions to political issues.
NEWS

NJ student activists convene at Rutgers for 1st meeting

The first organizational meeting for the New Jersey Student Power Network, a group of students and community organizers from all over the state, was held on Saturday.  Several Rutgers students attended the meeting, alongside students from other schools including TCNJ and Monmouth University. The meeting was coordinated by New Jersey Student Power, an organization devoted to developing networks of student activists, and Anakbayan New Jersey, a Filipino-American group that advocates for free education and social services. Matt Cordeiro, the millennial strategist for New Jersey Student Power and a Rutgers alumnus, said that the meeting served to unite otherwise disparate groups through the common goal of political change. “We can get people to come together and work on similar campaigns and channel that energy into concrete change,” Cordeiro said.

One of the drivers at Rutgers said that there are no designated breaks during his 8-12 hour shifts, which is why most drivers opt to make longer stops at the Rutgers Student Center.
NEWS

A day in the life of Steve — a Rutgers bus driver

The Rutgers University bus system, operating across the New Brunswick and Newark campuses, is the second largest bus system in the state, surpassed only by New Jersey Transit's statewide bus system. According to a press release from First Transit, the company that operates the Rutgers bus system, there are 70 bus drivers between the two campuses, and the fleet is 50 buses strong. “It's a good company.

Rutgers professor Alan Robock contributed to a Nobel Peace Prize-winning project, entitled the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN). His work has helped outline what the environmental impact of nuclear war would look like.
NEWS

Nobel Prize-winning professor discusses the prospect of nuclear war

Nuclear bombs may be the most destructive weapons ever invented, yet the greatest threat of nuclear war is not the sheer death toll of the immediate explosion but the environmental impact, argues Alan Robock, a distinguished professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences. Robock contributed to the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), which was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize this year for its work toward creating international legal prohibitions on the use and possession of nuclear weapons. The Norwegian Nobel Committee released a statement that said, “Through binding international agreements, the international community has previously adopted prohibitions against landmines, cluster munitions and biological and chemical weapons.

Stuff Yer Face recognized its 40th anniversary on Thursday with an all-night party for the community. The current owner has worked there for 23 years and helped the restaurant on Easton Avenue to become a staple of the city and the University.
NEWS

Stuff Yer Face celebrates 40 years of serving the Rutgers community

Most students have had at least one experience at local Rutgers restaurant Stuff Yer Face — from their popular bolis to huge fish bowls, the Easton Avenue restaurant has been a favorite among students for years.  But this year was special, as it celebrated its 40th-anniversary last week with an all-night party Thursday night before homecoming weekend. According to the Stuff Yer Face website, the restaurant is popular for its menu of international beers and its thousands of possible stromboli combinations. Matthew Poznick, Stuff Yer Face's owner, said in an email that the restaurant's original location was at 43 Easton Ave.

In response to a bill that could potentially cut $3.3 billion from the federal Pell Grant Program, the New Jersey Public Interest Research Group has launched a campaign to encourage Rutgers students to stand in support of the program. Starting on Oct. 30, the campus will take part in National Pell Week of Action.
NEWS

Rutgers rallies against $3.3 billion cut to the Pell Grant Program

The New Jersey Public Interest Research Group (NJPIRG) is campaigning against proposed cuts to the federal government's Pell Grant program. This bill, which includes a $3.3 billion cut to the Pell Grant program, has already been approved by Congress. The Senate is scheduled to vote on it on Dec.

Monday night, Students for Justice in Palestine hosted two local activists who spoke about the Boycott, Divest, Sanctions (BDS) movement. The organization's aim is to educate the Rutgers community about the conflict in Israel and Palestine.
NEWS

Students for Justice in Palestine invites activists to speak at Rutgers

Students for Justice in Palestine hosted its highlight event of the semester on Monday, called “Show Me How to Rise.” The event featured two local activists who spoke about the Boycott, Divest, Sanctions (BDS) movement, a transnational effort to protest Israel's conduct in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Abeerah Wasti, the president of Students for Justice in Palestine and a School of Arts and Sciences senior, said her organization's aim is to educate the Rutgers community about the conflict in Israel and Palestine.

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Gidon Coussin received his bachelor's degree in Israel before moving to the United States in 1999. Now, 18 years later, is attending Rutgers University to receive a Physician Assistant (PA) degree.
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Gidon Coussin received his bachelor's degree in Israel before moving to the United States in 1999. Now, 18 years later, is attending Rutgers University to receive a Physician Assistant (PA) degree.

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