Vandana Apte

Vandana Apte

Vandana Apte is a School of Environmental and Biological Sciences sophomore majoring in biotechnology with a minor in public health. Her column, “Under the Microscope,” runs on alternate Thursdays.


Recent Articles:

OPINION

APTE: Poverty makes healthy lifestyle unattainable

In my last column, I discussed the why we should care about the recent dietary guidelines. I’m not sure how many of you actually ate the recommended amount of vegetables, fruits, dairy, grains and protein today, but I’m sure many of you did not. So the question is: Why do so few Americans actually follow these guidelines and eat a healthy, balanced diet?

OPINION

Choosing between local farmers, GMOs is unnecessary

Many of my peers on Cook campus, which is dominated by students studying biotechnology and agriculture, often find it difficult to accommodate the two commonly held viewpoints with regard to genetically modified organisms and organic food. On one hand, there is the earthy-crunchy outlook that assumes GMOs damage the environment and are bad for human health. On the other hand, there is the viewpoint that the manipulation of organisms using modern biotechnology can significantly benefit society. Crunchy scientists (I’ll admit I am one) then have a problem: Where does our loyalty lie?

OPINION

Science, diversity in learning at Rutgers

Now that I have spent two years here at Rutgers, I can say with confidence that one of the most eye-opening things for me in college has been witnessing the wide range of socioeconomic diversity. I come from an upper-middle class, 99 percent white, suburban town in Massachusetts. Growing up, I pitied myself for having to stay with my “crappy” iPhone 3, while all my friends had fancy iPhone 5s and grumbled when my parents handed me a Lenovo ThinkPad laptop from the 1990s to use as my own personal computer in high school.

OPINION

Three parent babies: should DNA be altered to cure disease

After a majority vote in the House of Commons, Britain legally approved the creation of “three-parent babies.” In addition to having the normal nuclear DNA from a mother and a father, “three-parent babies” have mitochondrial DNA from a second mother. The in-vitro fertilization procedure involves mixing the nucleus of the first mother’s egg with the father’s sperm and the second mother’s egg’s cytoplasm, which contains mitochondria.

OPINION

Fine line between assisted reproduction, designing babies

Careers, money and the environment are a number of intertwined factors that affect fertility. Pressured by financial considerations, some couples might choose to delay starting a family. Women who relegate having a baby to the backburner might suddenly find themselves staring at the ticking biological clock when they become ready.

More Articles


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