Student stages creative comeback for her senior year at Rutgers


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Photo Illustration | Haley Temin hopes to apply her artistic skills by someday working for Nickelodeon.


In a large school like Rutgers, students have encountered an endless amount of people without actually getting the chance to dig past the basic and trivial facts. Each person has a side of himself or herself that tends to shy away from the spotlight, a talent or even passion they hide.

Haley Temin, a Mason Gross School of the Arts senior, is a prime example of how sometimes, one’s artistic side can become buried and lost when making the busy college transition. 

As a child, Temin gravitated toward coloring books and anything that had to do with creativity. Although she continued to develop her artistic abilities throughout high school, she took a break once coming to Rutgers. 

She figured a focus in public relations would encourage and enhance her artistic ability. However, she still felt as though a part of her artistic talent wasn’t being completely fulfilled. 

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Temin enjoys creating different illustrations of the human eye and plans on putting together a collection in the future.

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Temin’s favorite type of painting are portraits because every person’s face is different. She enjoys the challenge of perfecting her pieces to make them look exactly like a given subject.

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Temin’s favorite type of painting are portraits because every person’s face is different. She enjoys the challenge of perfecting her pieces to make them look exactly like a given subject.

In between, Temin became her sororities’ banner chair, where she was in charge of helping with all the creative projects. It was then that Temin made the decision to apply to Mason Gross and was accepted during spring break of her junior year. 

“I almost passed out when I got accepted. The rush of excitement that came over me — I was like, wow, senior year is set now,” Temin expressed. 

Temin’s favorite pieces to do are paintings because that’s where she feels her passion stems from the most. She especially loves portraits, due to the fact that they’re tangible, because they’re pieces people can own forever. 

Although Temin did attend the occasional art class, she managed to teach herself all the different techniques that apply to her creative process.

When it comes to her artistic process, Temin admits she’s a perfectionist. Some of her paintings have taken up to 35 hours, and she typically works in three to four hour intervals.

“I find I work better under pressure,” Temin said. “There’s nothing better than picking up that paint brush and going with the flow of the music. Hours could pass by, and I won’t even know. That’s the one thing I can hyper-focus on: painting and drawing.”

A future project Temin is planning highlights her interest in painting the human eye. She wants to create a collection of different eyes pertaining to culture and race, as well as animal eyes. 

When asked what her signature style was in terms of her work, Temin said it’s something that’s still developing. She described her paintings as always bright, crisp and well thought out, and she hopes people can really feel the amount of emotion that goes into it.

For students who are feeling nervous about incorporating art into their academics in fear of losing that motivation and spark, Temin explained that what saved her was not starting her freshman year of college as an art major.

“Art was one thing I was good at. I waited the perfect amount of time to learn now what I would’ve taken completely for granted as a freshman,” Temin said. “Art will follow you wherever you go. Clearly, it followed me and is [now] the one consistent thing in my life.”


Brenda Stolyar

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