Another day, another offensive YouTuber


Homophobic, misogynistic YouTube video perpetuates false stereotypes


Desperate YouTubers crossing the line for more views on their videos are nothing new, but a recent video hit extremely close to home. In a video called “Asking New Jersey Girls If They Spit Or Swallow,” 18-year-old Juan walks around the College Avenue campus at Rutgers and stops girls to ask them that question. The video was posted two months ago and already has more than 97,000 views, and Juan’s YouTube channel — which he started this past August — has more than 11,000 subscribers. 

Hopefully, most of these views are just from people (like those on our editorial board) who are completely disgusted by the blatant misogynistic and homophobic attitude of the entire video. He makes comments such as “I’m not gay, so I wouldn’t know, but how does it taste?” He specifically targets women to ask the questions, and stubbornly persists when some of them avoid the question or refuse to answer. It’s a form of sexual harassment, and we’re disturbed that someone could be getting away with this on a campus where we are supposed to feel safe. 

Past videos on his channel include “What Do Guys Prefer Ass Or Titties,” and “Jersey Girls On Doggy Or Missionary.” This is a guy who clearly has nothing better to do than embarrass himself on the Internet by putting up videos that are really doing absolutely nothing for him, other than ensuring that he’s going to have an extremely tough time getting employed, getting into college or getting a girlfriend. But as completely disgusted as we are by his videos, there are still plenty of people who find them funny, and sadly, there are hundreds of idiots out there like him looking for attention by posting stupid and offensive videos on YouTube. Unfortunately, they get that attention.

Throughout the video, Juan puts women in the uncomfortable position of being forced to answer his question: “Do you spit or swallow?” The responses were mixed. From a viewer’s perspective, it might be obvious that no one should humor such an unnecessary question with any kind of response. Juan claims that he “got consent” from everyone in the video because he said, “Can I ask you a question for a YouTube video?” directly before actually asking the questions. But when you’re stopped on the street on the spot like that, you can’t be blamed for your immediate reaction. 

The point here isn’t to judge the women who are in the video for how they chose to respond to an invasive, on-the spot-question. Maybe the question was inappropriate, but the real issue here is that instead of focusing on Juan’s actions, we tend to jump to conclusions about the women who are practically forced to respond. Women have been conditioned to live in a society that values them based on their sexuality, and this one puts them in a no-win situation: If they answer the question, they’re considered a slut, and if they don’t, then they’re just prude. The stereotypes that Juan perpetuates throughout his video of women, of “New Jersey girls” and of Rutgers specifically are more than just offensive. They’re dangerous because they serve to reinforce the patriarchal concepts that have held women back for so long.


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